Nutrition & Lifestyle

To Improve Weight Loss, Focus On Real People, Real Life & Real Food

By Christopher Fuzy, MS, RD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 11, No. 1. , 2010

Doctors who understand their patients’ unique personality traits and motivating factors, and who can provide individually-tailored food guidelines will go much further in empowering patients to meet their weight and health goals—and they’ll get there at much lower costs than with commercial programs based on processed meal replacements.

The Content you are trying to see is available only for members of our site. If you already have a Membership you need to log in to see it. Please follow this link if you want to register.

New Study Corroborates Ginger’s Benefit in Quelling Morning Sickness Nausea

By Tori Hudson, ND | Contributing Writer - Vol. 11, No. 1. , 2010

Ginger is widely available, safe, inexpensive, and, it turns out, one of the best possible remedies for pregnancy-associated nausea. A new clinical trial involving nearly 70 women, shows that at a dose of 250 mg, four times daily, ginger is highly effective in controlling nausea and reducing vomiting.

The Content you are trying to see is available only for members of our site. If you already have a Membership you need to log in to see it. Please follow this link if you want to register.

Supplement-Drug Interactions: Separating the Signals from the Noise

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor-in-Chief - Vol. 10, No. 4. , 2009

Doctors should be concerned about potential interactions between pharmaceuticals and supplements. But for many commonly cited interactions, the evidence is flimsy making it difficult to distinguish the real concerns from the noise. Fortunately there’s Creighton University’s Center for Drug Information and Evidence Based Practice, and its exhaustive frequently updated reference guides.

Vitamin D: New Findings, New Questions

By Michael Traub, ND - Vol. 9, No. 2. , 2008

Vitamin D deficiency has been linked with everything from psoriasis and osteoporosis to cardiovascular disease, diabetes and autoimmune diseases. But the relationships may not be as simple as we’d like to believe. Neither is the relationship between sun exposure and vitamin D production in the skin.

The Content you are trying to see is available only for members of our site. If you already have a Membership you need to log in to see it. Please follow this link if you want to register.

Well-Oiled: A Guide to Healthy Dietary Fats

By Janet Gulland | Contributing Writer - Vol. 8, No. 3. , 2007

The “No Fat” approach health maintenance makes very little sense, says Dr. David Riley. Rather than focusing on eliminating fat calories, physicians should be counseling patients on how to choose and use healthy, nutritious oils like flax, olive, walnut, macadamia and avocado. A little knowledge of fatty acid science can go a long way in clearing up confusion about “good” versus “bad” fats.

The Energetics of Foods for Health and Healing

By Susan Krieger, LAc, MS | Contributing Writer - Vol. 10, No. 2. , 2009

Biomedical science has reduced foods to the sum of their calories and micronutrients. While it is important to understand the biochemistry of what we eat, it is also important to realize that the qualities, colors, textures of our foods and the ways they are cooked play just as much of a role as their “nutrient content” in influencing our health. Traditional Chinese medicine has much to teach us on this subject.

The Content you are trying to see is available only for members of our site. If you already have a Membership you need to log in to see it. Please follow this link if you want to register.

Oximation in Practice: Clearing Acne & Related Skin Disorders

By Roby Mitchell, MD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 10, No. 2. , 2009

Acne, psoriasis, rosacea and other common skin disorders are reflections of the same systemic inflammatory processes that underlie heart disease, diabetes, irritable bowel, and many other chronic disorders. Eliminating high-glycemic foods, restoring hormone balance, and minimizing inflammation will not only resolve these skin problems, they will also reduce risk of more serious diseases along the way.

Exercise Centers Are a Good “Fit” For Primary Care Clinics

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor-in-Chief - Vol. 10, No. 1. , 2009

A growing number of primary care doctors are discovering that clinic-based exercise centers are a good “fit” for their patients’ physical health, and for their own fiscal health. A turnkey model called Integrative Health Network (iH3) is enabling more doctors to bring exercise medicine into their practices and to people who might never set foot in a commercial fitness club.

GGT: An Accurate, Inexpensive Predictor of Cardiometabolic Risk

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor-in-Chief - Vol. 9, No. 4. , 2008

Gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) is a hepatic enzyme that indicates levels of oxidative stress in the liver. A large body of research suggests that it can also predict onset of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. At under $10 per test, it could be a very valuable asset in clinical practice.

The Content you are trying to see is available only for members of our site. If you already have a Membership you need to log in to see it. Please follow this link if you want to register.

Iridology: Mirror of the Soul, Perhaps, But the Iris Is Unreliable for Medical Diagnosis

By Cathy Creger Rosenbaum, PharmD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 9, No. 3. , 2008

The notion that the patterns of color and texture in the irises of the eyes can indicate the health or dysfunction of various organ systems, has been around for several hundred years. Unfortunately, scientific study of iridology fails to support it as an accurate method for detecting diseases. Despite the lack of evidence, the practice remains popular, particularly in Europe and the UK.

The Content you are trying to see is available only for members of our site. If you already have a Membership you need to log in to see it. Please follow this link if you want to register.