Acupuncture & Oriental Med

Cupping Therapy: A Modern Take on an Ancient Technique

By Stacy Collier, Contributing Writer

For thousands of years cupping therapy—the placement of special cups over areas of pain or restriction and creating negative pressure (vacuum) to disrupt the stagnation–played an important role in medicine. This ancient practice spanned from Egypt, to China, Greece, Europe and the Americas.  Though most commonly used for musculoskeletal pain relief, the clinical applications are […]

Modern Acupuncture: Ancient Modality, Mass-Market Model

By Kristen Schepker, Assistant Editor

Modern Acupuncture, the country’s first acupuncture franchise, is bringing the ancient healing practice to the masses with a unique focus on convenience and affordability. But is it watering down and oversimplifying this venerable modality?

doTERRA, the Essential Oil Titan, Launches Healthcare System

By Erik Goldman, Editor

doTERRA, one of the world’s leading marketers of botanical essential oils for healthcare uses, is launching a healthcare system. Guided by a bold vision of transforming American healthcare, the company is planning a nationwide network of integrative medical clinics wholly owned and overseen by doTERRA, that would operate on a membership or concierge-style model, in […]

The Energetics of Foods for Health and Healing

By Susan Krieger, LAc, MS | Contributing Writer - Vol. 10, No. 2. , 2009

Biomedical science has reduced foods to the sum of their calories and micronutrients. While it is important to understand the biochemistry of what we eat, it is also important to realize that the qualities, colors, textures of our foods and the ways they are cooked play just as much of a role as their “nutrient content” in influencing our health. Traditional Chinese medicine has much to teach us on this subject.

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Is Acupuncture Useful in Treating Hypertension?

By John C. Longhurst, MD, PhD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 8, No. 4. , 2007

By reducing sympathetic nervous system activity, acupuncture can be a valuable tool in treating mild-to-moderate hypertension. In some cases, it can obviate the need for antihypertensive drugs which often have a lot of side effects. Researchers at the Susan Samueli Center for Integrative Medicine at the University of California, Irvine, are learning how acupuncture works at the neuronal level.

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Japanese Researchers Find Ampelopsis Vine Harbors Potential Hepatitis Therapy

By Janet Gulland | Contributing Writer - Vol. 8, No. 4. , 2007

Ampelopsis brevipedunculata aka Porcelainberry, a rapidly growing vine in the grape family, has become a bane of many American gardeners and landscapers, owing to its rapid and invasive growth. In Japan, it has been used as a medicinal for centuries. Recent research suggests the “grapes” from this plant can halt liver fibrosis and improve liver function in people with hepatitis.

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The Five Faces of ADHD: A Chinese Medicine Approach

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor-in-Chief - Vol. 8, No. 2. , 2007

What works for attention deficit disorder? Depends on the kid, says Dr. Stephen Cowan, a holistic pediatrician who uses the Five Elements concepts from traditional Chinese medicine in working with attention problems in children. He believes modern drug therapies, with their one-size-fits-all philosophy, are doing more harm than good for many of these kids. The Five Elements approach recognizes that children are different from one another, and opens up a healthier way of addressing this increasingly common problem.

TCM Herbs Help Break the Stress-Insomnia-Obesity Triad

By Bob Garrison, R.Ph. and Kerry Hughes, M.Sc. | Contributing Writer - Vol. 7, No. 3. , 2006

Stress, sleeplessness and weight gain are inter-related and self-reinforcing problems that wreak havoc on an individual’s health. Researchers are starting to understand how these problems are connected. The good news is, a combination of two Chinese herbs, Magnolia and Phellodendron, can safely and effectively break the metabolic cycles that drive these conditions.

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