Nutrition & Lifestyle

Sustainable Weight Loss: Understanding Famine Physiology and the Psychology of Obesity

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief - Vol. 8, No. 3. , 2007

In 2001, Jon Abrams was a successful fast-track Wall Streeter. He was also morbidly obese, weighing over 400 lb. Despite disciplined dieting on everything from Atkins to Zone, he couldn’t lose weight, until he began to understand why his body wanted to be fat. Speaking at the American Holistic Medical Association’s annual conference, he shared lessons learned on his journey back to fitness.

Connexins: Optimizing Health by Improving Intercellular Communication

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief - Vol. 8, No. 1. , 2007

Connexins are the molecules that connect cells together and regulate passage of biochemical signals through our tissues. Their degree of openness, and consequently, the level of intercellular information flow, is greatly affected by nutrition, lifestyle and environmental factors-especially the relative acidity of one’s diet. Neurophysiologist Darrell Tanelian, MD, PhD, has developed a comprehensive, user-friendly diet and lifestyle program aimed at improving health by improving connexin function at the cellular level.

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Sweet Tempeh-tation: Making the Most of a Nutritious Soy Food

By Rob Streisfeld, NMD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 8, No. 1. , 2007

Much of the controversy over the health benefits or hazards of a soy rich diet arises because people fail to recognize the difference between fermented and unfermented soy. Fermentation ups the beneficia aspects of soy, while minimizing the downsides. Tempeh, a soy cake fermented with Rhizopus mold, is one of the most nutritious and delicious soy foods—one you and your patients should know. Doc Rob, our healthy kitchen guru, offers tips on making tempeh tempting.

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Catch-22: Can We Harvest the Health Benefits of Seafood Without Destroying the Oceans?

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief - Vol. 7, No. 4. , 2006

The recent Institute of Medicine and Harvard reports on seafood safety go a long way in allaying public concern about mercury toxicity in fish and affirming fish as a healthy food. But they largely overlook the precarious state of the world’s oceans. Can we have our fish and eat them too? Yes, say marine biologists, but only with major changes in fisheries management and consumer consciousness.

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Cultures of Healing: Traditional Fermented Foods Find Their Place in the Modern World

By Rob Streisfeld, NMD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 7, No. 4. , 2006

There’s a reason why nearly all traditional cultures worldwide have some form of fermented food as part of their dietary staples. Unfortunately, in the rush to modernity and “convenience,” many people have lost the taste for things like kefir, kimchi, and natto. These and other fermented foods are extremely healthy, providing a rich source of probiotic gut bacteria, which aid digestion, reduce inflammation and promote overall health.

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The Case for Buying Organic: Is Organically-Grown Food Truly Healthier?

By Laryn Callaway, ND | Contributing Writer - Vol. 7, No. 4. , 2006

With consumer demand for organic foods soaring all over the country, it’s a reasonable question to ask. According to Dr. Laryn Callaway, the best available data points to a resounding yes. Organically-grown foods have higher nutrient levels than their conventionally-grown counterparts, and lower levels of pesticide/herbicide residue.

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Whole Grains Mean a Whole Lot Less Diabetes

By Staff Writer - Vol. 7, No. 4. , 2006

Daily consumption of magnesium-rich whole grains took a 30% bite out of the risk of diabetes among a cohort of more than 40,000 Black women, according to a recently published transatlantic study.

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Chocolate Chipping Away at High Cholesterol

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief

Packed with lipid-lowering plant sterols and several types of fiber, Right Direction chocolate chip cookies are a drug-free way of helping mildly dyslipidemic patients reduce their cardiovascular risk.

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High-Veg, Low-Fat Diets Prevent Progression, Recurrence of Breast, Colon Cancer

By Janet Gulland | Contributing Writer - Vol. 7, No. 2. , 2006

NEW YORK—Data from three new clinical trials show that reducing dietary fat to levels below 20% of total calories, and increasing vegetable and fruit intake can prevent relapses of breast cancer, and reduce colon cancer, reported David Alberts, MD, at a conference on Nutrition and Health, sponsored by Columbia University’s Rosenthal Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, and the University of Arizona’s Program in Integrative Medicine.

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Ifs, Ands, and Butts: To Help Patients Quit, First Improve Their Health Status

By Erik Goldman | Editor in Chief - Vol. 7, No. 2. , 2006

According to Dr. Charles Bens, designer of the Healthy Smoker tobacco cessation program, it is essential to improve other aspects of a smoker’s health before trying to break the habit. Even if someone continues to smoke, a shift toward a healthier diet and lifestyle can attenuate many of the damaging effects of tobacco smoke.

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