Nutrition & Lifestyle

Iridology: Mirror of the Soul, Perhaps, But the Iris Is Unreliable for Medical Diagnosis

By Cathy Creger Rosenbaum, PharmD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 9, No. 3. , 2008

The notion that the patterns of color and texture in the irises of the eyes can indicate the health or dysfunction of various organ systems, has been around for several hundred years. Unfortunately, scientific study of iridology fails to support it as an accurate method for detecting diseases. Despite the lack of evidence, the practice remains popular, particularly in Europe and the UK.

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IV Nutritional Therapies: Infusions Overcome Limitations of Oral Supplementation

By Kenneth W. Cartaxo, MD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 9, No. 2. , 2008

The intravenous use of vitamins, minerals, amino acids, essential fatty acids, and other important nutrients has a long and venerable history in American medicine. But while most physicians know about it, only a small number of us are making use of these beneficial therapies to help our patients.

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New Probiotic Company Plans to “Share the Health” in Regions of Strife

By Janet Gulland | Contributing Writer - Vol. 9, No. 2. , 2008

Probiotics have great potential to help people in strife-torn regions recover digestive health and nutritional status. The problem has been to develop formulations that deliver high doses of the beneficial bugs without need for refrigeration. With his new Vidazorb line and an outreach program called “Share the Health,” socially-conscious entrepreneur E. Frank Hodal is meeting that challenge.

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New Board Offers Nutrition Certification for All Licensed Health Care Professionals

By Arthur A. Fierro, DC | Contributing Writer - Vol. 9, No. 2. , 2008

In an effort to improve nutrition education for all health care professionals, he American Clinical Board of Nutrition (ACBN) has launched the first federally-recognized nutrition science certification program. Certification is open to licensed health professionals from any and all of the healing disciplines.

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Vitamin D: New Findings, New Questions

By Michael Traub, ND - Vol. 9, No. 2. , 2008

Vitamin D deficiency has been linked with everything from psoriasis and osteoporosis to cardiovascular disease, diabetes and autoimmune diseases. But the relationships may not be as simple as we’d like to believe. Neither is the relationship between sun exposure and vitamin D production in the skin.

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Well-Oiled: A Guide to Healthy Dietary Fats

By Janet Gulland | Contributing Writer - Vol. 8, No. 3. , 2007

The “No Fat” approach health maintenance makes very little sense, says Dr. David Riley. Rather than focusing on eliminating fat calories, physicians should be counseling patients on how to choose and use healthy, nutritious oils like flax, olive, walnut, macadamia and avocado. A little knowledge of fatty acid science can go a long way in clearing up confusion about “good” versus “bad” fats.

The Energetics of Foods for Health and Healing

By Susan Krieger, LAc, MS | Contributing Writer - Vol. 10, No. 2. , 2009

Biomedical science has reduced foods to the sum of their calories and micronutrients. While it is important to understand the biochemistry of what we eat, it is also important to realize that the qualities, colors, textures of our foods and the ways they are cooked play just as much of a role as their “nutrient content” in influencing our health. Traditional Chinese medicine has much to teach us on this subject.

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Electrodermal Testing: What It Can and Cannot Tell

By Cathy Creger Rosenbaum, PharmD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 9, No. 1. , 2008

Over the last decade, there’s been an explosion of “alternative” diagnostic methods purporting to identify nutrient deficiencies, detect environmental toxins, predict serious diseases, and help guide health conscious individuals in their diet and supplementation choices.

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Tackling the Most Common Nutritional Deficiencies: Fiber, Long-Chain Fatty Acids, Vitamin D

By August West | Contributing Writer - Vol. 9, No. 1. , 2008

Many Americans are well fed but poorly nourished, thanks to a calorie rich, nutrient poor diet. This is a major driver of chronic diseases. Fortunately, it’s correctable. In the first of a two-part article, Steven Masley, MD, a nutrition-centered primary care doctor, offers tips for managing the most common deficiencies, including fiber, omega-3s, vitamin D and the B vitamins.

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