Healthy Aging

Black Cohosh Compares Favorably With Drug Therapy for Menopausal Symptoms

By Tori Hudson, ND | Contributing Writer - Vol. 9, No. 3. , 2008

In the first head to head comparison of a botanical therapy versus a drug for management of menopausal symptoms, a standardized formulation of Black Cohosh was equally effective as tibolone, a drug widely used in Europe and Asia; the herbal formula had fewer adverse effects. Pycnogenol, an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory derived from the bark of French Maritime Pine trees, can reduce menopausal symptoms while improving women’s lipid profiles.

The Content you are trying to see is available only for members of our site. If you already have a Membership you need to log in to see it. Please follow this link if you want to register.

Metabolic Cardiology: Solving the Heart’s Energy Crisis

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor-in-Chief - Vol. 9, No. 2. , 2008

A new vanguard of “metabolic” cardiologists contends that cholesterol elevation has been overstated as a cause of heart disease, and that physicians should pay more attention to the heart muscle itself. A quartet of nutrients magnesium, co-enzyme Q10, L-carnitine, and D-ribose can profoundly improve the heart’s pumping ability and reduce risk of death, even in very ill patients.

Medical Aromatherapy Offers Safe, Patient-Friendly Tools to Treat Memory Impairment

By Kamyar Hedayat, MD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 9, No. 1. , 2008

Essential oils of Sage, Lavender, Rosemary and a number of other aromatic medicinal plants contain compounds that have direct stimulatory effects on memory formation, while at the same time helping to reduce stress, a major contributor to memory loss.

The Content you are trying to see is available only for members of our site. If you already have a Membership you need to log in to see it. Please follow this link if you want to register.

Can Vitamin D & Calcium Reduce Diabetes Risk?

By Staff Writer - Vol. 9, No. 1. , 2008

A recent metanalysis by Tufts researchers shows a clear correlation between vitamin D deficiency and increased likelihood of type 2 diabetes. The data also suggest that combined supplementation with vitamin D and calcium may prevent progression to diabetes in high-risk individuals.

The Content you are trying to see is available only for members of our site. If you already have a Membership you need to log in to see it. Please follow this link if you want to register.

D, C and CVD: New Studies Correlate Deficiencies With Cardiovascular Risk

By August West | Contributing Writer - Vol. 9, No. 1. , 2008

Two new studies provide fresh data showing that deficiencies in vitamin D and vitamin C are strongly associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction and stroke. The big-and still unanswered question—is whether supplementing with these vitamins will reduce that risk.

The Content you are trying to see is available only for members of our site. If you already have a Membership you need to log in to see it. Please follow this link if you want to register.

Going Against the Flow: Botanical Allies Help Mitigate Urinary Incontinence

By Stephen Siegel, MD & Joanna Cohen | Contributing Writers - Vol. 8, No. 3. , 2007

Urinary incontinence is common, and incidence will only increase as the population ages. Conventional drugs often have unwanted side-effects. Fortunately, there are a number of herbal allies like rosehips, saw palmetto, and teasel, as well as homeopathic remedies that can help strengthen urinary tract smooth muscle and reduce involuntary urine flow.

The Content you are trying to see is available only for members of our site. If you already have a Membership you need to log in to see it. Please follow this link if you want to register.

Confronting the Challenge of Polypharmacy

By Cathy Creger Rosenbaum, PharmD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 8, No. 2. , 2007

Polypharmacy, the progressive piling on of medications, is one of the biggest unspoken public health threats facing the nation. Simply put, more meds means more adverse events and drug interactions. The problem is only going to grow as the Boomer generation ages, unless physicians and patients work together to use medications more judiciously.

The Content you are trying to see is available only for members of our site. If you already have a Membership you need to log in to see it. Please follow this link if you want to register.

Angelica Extract Brings New Mechanism to Bear on Alzheimer’s Disease

By Thomas Walshe, MD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 8, No. 2. , 2007

The patient, a 51-year-old woman, “showed jealousy toward her husband as the first noticeable sign of the disease. Soon a rapidly increasing loss of memory could be noticed. She could not find her way around her own apartment.

The Content you are trying to see is available only for members of our site. If you already have a Membership you need to log in to see it. Please follow this link if you want to register.

The Vascular Roots of Osteoarthritis

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief - Vol. 8, No. 1. , 2007

Osteoarthritis is the end result of the same disease process that leads to atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction, according to Dr. Phil Cheras, an Australian investigator whose research shows that the vessels supplying the joints in patients with osteoarthritis become blocked with blood clots and lipid droplets. The good news is that triterpene compounds derived from the African shea nut can reverse this process in many patients with this devastating disease.

The Content you are trying to see is available only for members of our site. If you already have a Membership you need to log in to see it. Please follow this link if you want to register.