Topics

Low-Fat Diet May Beat Down Belly Bugs: Good for the Heart, Good for the Gizzard

By August West | Contributing Writer - Vol. 1, No. 1. , 2000

Linoleic acid and other polyunsaturated “good” fats can inhibit the growth of Helicobacter pylori, the bug that contributes to development of peptic ulcers. The research suggests that reducing saturated fat and increasing polyunsaturates may be a good way to control ulcers.

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Is Homocysteine Dead?

By Michael Traub, ND - Vol. 6, No. 4. , 2005

There are some major design flaws in the NORVIT trial, which suggested that there’s little cardiovascular benefit to lowering homocysteine with folic acid therapy. Don’t throw out your folic acid yet!

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Simple Solutions for Common Nutrient Deficiencies

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief - Vol. 1, No. 1. , 2000

Many people who end up in doctors’ offices have nutritional deficiencies, including deficiencies in protein, B vitamins, and magnesium that markedly impact their overall health status. These deficiencies are easily reversed, if only physicians would think about them.

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Women’s Health Update: News from NAMS

By Tori Hudson, ND - Vol. 6, No. 4. , 2005

Despite its conservative orientation toward natural medicine, the North American Menopause Society annual meeting is a great place to catch up on the latest menopause-related research. Dr. Tori Hudson offers her gleanings from this year’s meeting.

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Tobacco Smoking Increases Psoriasis Risk

By Jim Rowe | Contributing Writer - Vol. 1, No. 1. , 2000

US and European studies show that tobacco smoking increases risk of psoriasis, as does frequent consumption of alcohol. These correlations appear to be stronger in men than in women. Keratinocytes, the skin cells that produce the characteristic scaling of psoriasis, have receptors for nicotine.

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EpiCor: A New Ally for Enhancing the Immune System

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief - Vol. 7, No. 3. , 2006

Originally developed as a fortifier for animal feeds, a yeast-fermentation product called EpiCor is proving highly effective in strengthening the human immune system against a whole range of common infectious pathogens. EpiCor is also very high in B vitamins, antioxidants, and minerals.

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Botanical Medicine’s “Shiny Horse” Rides to the Rescue of Damaged Mucous Membranes

By Janet Gulland | Contributing Writer - Vol. 7, No. 3. , 2006

Named for Pegasus, the flying horse of Greek myth, Sea Buckthorn plant (Hippophae rhamnoides) has been mainstay of traditional medicine in Eastern Europe and Asia for centuries. Its orange berries are very rich in Omega 7 fatty acids as well as vitamin E and other compounds speed the healing and support the integrity of the skin and other mucous membranes. It may have an important role in treating irritable bowel syndrome and other gut problems.

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Iodine Therapy Gains Favor for Thyroid Problems, Chronic Fatigue

By Staff Writer - Vol. 6, No. 4. , 2005

Iodine, once a mainstay medical therapy that was largely abandoned after WWII, is experiencing something of a resurgence for treatment of thyroid problems, chronic fatigue, women’s health problems, and even diabetes.

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The Three-Question Diet Profile

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief - Vol. 1, No. 1. , 2000

Three simple questions can tell a lot about someone’s nutritional status and diet consciousness. How many daily servings of fruit and vegetables do you eat? Do you drink milk everyday? Do you take a daily multivitamin?

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Don’t Worry, B Happy: Therapeutic Uses of the B Vitamins

By August West | Contributing Writer - Vol. 7, No. 2. , 2006

When it comes to managing a broad range of common chronic conditions and quickly improving patients’ overall sense of wellbeing, few things pack as much therapeutic punch as the B vitamins. A look at this family of friendly vitamins and how best to use them.

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