Topics

Equol Rights: Researchers Rediscover Soy’s “Forgotten” Isoflavone

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief - Vol. 3, No. 1. , 2002

Genistein and daidzein are the two best-known phytoestrogens identified in soy. But roughly one-third of all people who eat soy can metabolize diadzein into equol, which is among the most potent plant estrogens known. This could account for the widely variant outcomes in clinical trials of soy for prevention of breast cancer, menopausal symptoms and other clinical conditions.

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Old Traumas Haunt Childbirth

By Staff Writer - Vol. 2, No. 3. , 2001

Women with histories of emotional and/or physical abuse may experience a lot of emotional upheaval in conjunction with the process of giving birth. Compassionate and understanding physicians can go a long way toward easing the process.

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The CADRE Summit: Growing Evidence Supports Role of Chromium in Prevention, Treatment of Diabetes

By Janet Gulland | Contributing Writer - Vol. 4, No. 3. , 2003

The trace element chromium, and particularly chromium picolinate, will likely find a greater role in the management of insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes (T2D) in the coming years, as clinical evidence accumulates to support its antiglycemic, insulin-sensitizing effects. Chromium researchers from across the globe recently gathered to share their findings at a summit sponsored by the Council for the Advancement of Diabetes Research and Education (CADRE).

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In Memoriam: William R. Fair, MD

By Staff Writer - Vol. 3, No. 1. , 2002

Dr. William Fair was as old-school and conventional as any oncologic surgeon could get. His faith in the power of the scalpel was nearly unshakeable, until he himself was diagnosed with inoperable colon cancer. That diagnosis prompted him on a quest into the worlds of nutrition, yoga, meditation, botanical medicine and touch therapy. He devoted the last years of his distinguished life to creation of Haelth, a New York City integrative health center bringing together the best of natural medicine with conventional allopathic care.

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Functional Medicine: Nutrition’s Info Revolution

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief - Vol. 3, No. 1. , 2002

The core tenet of the emerging discipline of functional medicine is that nutrition is the major determinant of gene expression, and therefore of health and disease. Functional medicine pioneer Jeff Bland, PhD, explains how, in a sense, food is information that tells the genes what to do. Depending on the signals we send our genes, they can produce health and happiness or depression and disease.

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Water Births Expected to Make Big Splash in Coming Decade

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief - Vol. 2, No. 3. , 2001

For healthy, low-risk pregnant women, water births—giving birth in a pool of warm water—-can reduce time spent in labor, lower the need for Cesarean section, and increase the chances that the birth process will be uncomplicated. Though popular in France, water births are still rare in the US, but the numbers are growing. Holistic Ob.Gyn., Jan Stafl, MD, describes his experiences.

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Tackling the Most Common Nutritional Deficiencies: B Vitamins, Calcium & Other Minerals

By August West | Contributing Writer - Vol. 9, No. 2. , 2008

Despite consuming greater quantities of food than any other population on Earth, many Americans are suffering multiple nutrient deficiencies. In this second part of his lecture Steven C. Masley, MD, a family physician and nutritionist, offers guidelines for supplementation with B vitamins, calcium, magnesium and other key nutrients.

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Stemming the Diabetes Tidal Wave: A Comprehensive, Holistic Approach

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief - Vol. 4, No. 3. , 2003

Type 2 diabetes and its precursors like impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance represent “a complex set of interrelated problems requiring a comprehensive treatment approach,” said Lev Linkner, MD, at a course on holistic medicine sponsored by the American Board of Holistic Medicine (ABHM).

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Neither Food Nor Drug: Is It Time for a Third Regulatory Category?

By Florence Rollwagen, PhD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 2, No. 3. , 2001

Dietary supplements are regulated as foods in the US, but in many cases, they are used like drugs, creating a difficult regulatory conundrum. Many thought leaders in the field believe the problem could be solved by creating a third regulatory category that recognizes the ways in which supplements are different from both drugs and foods.

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Novel Imaging Technique Reveals Breast Benefits of Soy Supplementation

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief - Vol. 3, No. 1. , 2002

A new imaging technique called Breast Enhanced Scintigraphy Testing has provided the first visual evidence that routine supplementation with soy isoflavones can reduce the size of pre-malignant breast lesions in women at increased risk of breast cancer.

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