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“Food as Medicine” Conference Offers Practical, Experiential Nutrition Training

By Staff Writer - Vol. 2, No. 2. , 2002

The Center for Mind-Body Medicine’s innovative “Food as Medicine” conference provides physicians with a comprehensive, scientifically-sound education in the application of nutrition for the management of a wide range of common, chronic disorders.

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Can Vitamin D & Calcium Reduce Diabetes Risk?

By Staff Writer - Vol. 9, No. 1. , 2008

Supplementation with vitamin D and calcium makes sense as a strategy to reduce risk of type 2 diabetes in people with insulin resistance or other risk factors.

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New Vitamin A RDA: Real Darned Ambiguous

By Joyce Frieden | Contributing Writer - Vol. 2, No. 1. , 2001

Despite the fact that carotenoids in fruits and vegetables are not converted to vitamin A in nearly the amounts previously thought, a panel convened by the Institute of Medicine recently lowered the recommended daily allowance for this key vitamin and held back on recommending vitamin A supplementation.

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Blood Type Diet Pioneer Urges “Go-Slow” Approach to Nutritional Change

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief - Vol. 2, No. 2. , 2002

BELLEVUE, WA—The surging popularity of “Eat Right 4 Your Type,” the book by Peter D’Adamo, ND, outlining the theory and practice of the so-called “blood type diets,” has a growing number of people making sudden alterations in their habitual eating patterns.

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Decoding DSHEA: FDA Study Shows Current Labels Confuse Supplement Consumers

By Dana Trevas | Contributing Writer - Vol. 1, No. 2. , 2000

Supplement marketing language, as regulated by the Dietary Supplement Health Education Act (DSHEA) of 1994, is supposed to help consumers and make them aware that the FDA has not validated supplement claims. Consumer surveys show, however, that DSHEA-speak ends up confusing consumers more times than not.

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Increasing Dietary Omega-3’s Takes “Fishful” Thinking

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief - Vol. 2, No. 1. , 2001

Most people know that fish is “healthy” food, but many people do not like it, and it is a challenge for them to get healthful omega-3s into their diets. Sonja Connor, RD, a nutrition counselor, offers tips for demystifying seafood for landlubbers, and making it palatable for fish-phobes.

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Tackling the Most Common Nutritional Deficiencies: Fiber, Long-Chain Fatty Acids, Vitamin D

By August West | Contributing Writer - Vol. 9, No. 1. , 2008

Many Americans are well fed but poorly nourished, thanks to a calorie rich, nutrient poor diet. This is a major driver of chronic diseases. Fortunately, it’s correctable. In the first of a two-part article, Steven Masley, MD, a nutrition-centered primary care doctor, offers tips for managing the most common deficiencies, including fiber, omega-3s, vitamin D and the B vitamins.

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Fake Supplement Sites Are Part of FTC’s Regulatory Redress

By Dana Trevas | Contributing Writer - Vol. 1, No. 2. , 2000

The Federal Trade Commission, which regulates dietary supplement claims, has established a number of phony supplement websites featuring appealing but implausible health claims, in an effort to raise consumer awareness about the dangers of false claims, and push the industry to clean up its marketing act.

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Highlights of the International Workshop on Omega-3 Fatty Acids, Diabetes and Cardiovascular Risk

By Staff Writer - Vol. 2, No. 1. , 2001

Omega-3 researchers from around the world gathered in Bethesda to present the latest findings from clinical studies on the effects of omega-3’s in preventing and treating heart disease, diabetes and other conditions. A review of some of the most compelling presentations.

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Nutritional Therapies for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

By Janet Gulland | Contributing Writer - Vol. 9, No. 1. , 2008

A unique form of hyperinsulinemia is one of the metabolic drivers of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). According to Dr. Alan Gaby, nutritional therapies aimed at normalizing insulin action and glucose metabolism can greatly benefit women with this condition, often restoring ovulation and fertility. N-acetyl cysteine, vitamin D, chromium, and a little known nutrient called pinitol are valuable allies.

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