Topics

Intensive Essential Oil Therapy: Effective Treatment for Common Acute Infections

By Corinne Adrion-Israelsen | Contributing Writer - Vol. 7, No. 4. , 2006

In the US, most people use aromatic essential oils for relaxation and other forms of aromatherapy. In France, they have a long history of internal use for the prevention and treatment of common infections. Corinne Andrion-Israelsen, who trained in the French tradition, explores the history and clinical application of plant essential oils.

The Content you are trying to see is available only for members of our site. If you already have a Membership you need to log in to see it. Please follow this link if you want to register.

Healing Words: Communicating Effectively With Your Patients

By Lee Lipsenthal, MD, ABHM | Contributing Writer - Vol. 7, No. 4. , 2006

A physician’s words and manner of communicating can be of great help or great harm to patients. Lee Lipsenthal, MD, looks at communication styles that help activate a patient’s own innate healing abilities.

The Content you are trying to see is available only for members of our site. If you already have a Membership you need to log in to see it. Please follow this link if you want to register.

HPC Readers Boost TACT Trial Enrollment

By Staff Writer - Vol. 9, No. 2. , 2008

Readers of Holistic Primary Care are giving a big boost to the Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT), a landmark placebo-controlled study funded by the National Institutes of Health to determine whether chelation therapy can prevent heart attacks.

The Content you are trying to see is available only for members of our site. If you already have a Membership you need to log in to see it. Please follow this link if you want to register.

Vitamin D2 or D3: Which Is D Best?

By Tori Hudson, ND | Contributing Writer - Vol. 9, No. 2. , 2008

A wealth of studies in recent years have underscored the health threats posed by vitamin D deficiency. But considerable debate has raged over which form of the vitamin is the best for supplementation. Many clinicians believe that vitamin D3, derived from fish and other animal sources, is more potent than D2, the “vegetarian” form. But new data suggest that may not be true.

The Content you are trying to see is available only for members of our site. If you already have a Membership you need to log in to see it. Please follow this link if you want to register.