Topics

Gut Specialists Begin Thinking Holistically

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief - Vol. 1, No. 2. , 2000

A small but growing number of gastroenterologists are starting to look seriously at botanical medicines, probiotics, nutritional interventions, and Asian therapies like acupuncture for the management of chronic, difficult-to-treat digestive disorders like irritable bowel syndrome, Crohn’s disease, and ulcers. Robert Greenlaw, MD, an Illinois gastroenterologist, shares his clinical experiences.

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Clearing Up Confusion About Calcium

By Janet Gulland | Contributing Writer - Vol. 6, No. 2. , 2005

Millions of Americans take calcium in the hopes of preventing osteoporosis. But without understanding how calcium, vitamin D and various hormones interact, many will not get the benefits they seek. Plus, a comparative look at various forms of supplemental calcium.

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The Vascular Roots of Osteoarthritis

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief - Vol. 8, No. 1. , 2007

Osteoarthritis is the end result of the same disease process that leads to atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction, according to Dr. Phil Cheras, an Australian investigator whose research shows that the vessels supplying the joints in patients with osteoarthritis become blocked with blood clots and lipid droplets. The good news is that triterpene compounds derived from the African shea nut can reverse this process in many patients with this devastating disease.

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Institute of Medicine Likely to Increase Vitamin D Recommendations

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief

The Institute of Medicine’s current guidelines for vitamin D intake, established in 1997, recommend 200 IU per day for people under 50 IOM, and 400 IU for those between 50-70 years old. Those numbers are way too low, say many physicians. In light of new studies showing myriad benefits and few risks from higher levels, IOM is likely to increase its recommended intake in its updated 2010 guidelines.

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Omega-Rich Eggs Offer DHA, Sunny-Side Up

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief - Vol. 1, No. 2. , 2000

Researchers have figured out a way to get a healthful omega-3 fatty acid into eggs, by feeding chickens with omega-rich marine algae. Gold Circle Farms was the first to market the DHA-rich eggs as an alternative for health conscious but fish-phobic consumers. Four of these eggs give as much DHA as a 3.5-ounce chunk of salmon.

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Plant Based Diet, Omega-3s Give Long-term Relief for Arthritis, Chronic Pain

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief

SEATTLE—Nutritional strategies can make a world of difference for patients with chronic pain and inflammation problems like arthritis, low back pain, and fibromyalgia, said Benjamin Kligler, MD, at an Integrative Pain Management symposium sponsored by Columbia University’s Rosenthal Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

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What is a “Patient-Centered Medical Home”?

By Staff Writer

The Joint Principles established by the AAFP, AAP, AOA and ACP, which form the basis of the medical home certification process, define a PCMH as a practice that meets the following core criteria:

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Parents’ Food Fears Shouldn’t Dictate Child’s Diet

By Peggy Peck | Contributing Writer - Vol. 1, No. 2. , 2000

Parental concerns about their own fat intake should not necessarily define diets for their children. While childhood obesity is clearly a major public health problem, it is important to remember that young children need certain amounts of dietary fat. Forcing children to adhere to adult weight loss regimens is not necessarily the best way to address the childhood obesity problem.

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Enhancing Nutritional Status to Improve Fertility

By Chris Meletis, ND

Roughly 1 in 7 American couples have difficulty conceiving, and each year they spend between $2-3 billion on fertility drugs, assisted reproduction, and other medical services. In many cases, drug based interventions can be avoided through greater attention to the couple’s nutritional status and stress level, both of which profoundly affect fertility.

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