Chronic Disease

Hormone Therapies Improve Symptoms and Delay Progression of MS

By August West | Contributing Writer - Vol. 10, No. 1. , 2009

Just a few years ago, MS had rendered Kathryn Simpson bed-ridden and in constant pain. Today, at 54 years old, she’s completely symptom-free, and highly active. Comprehensive hormone balancing therapies aimed at re-calibrating the endocrine system and reducing inflammation was the key, and it represents a new therapeutic approach to a disease most doctors deem hopeless.

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Heal Thy Practice: Business Strategies That Put the Health Back into Health Care

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor-in-Chief - Vol. 10, No. 1. , 2009

Given the current economic conditions, it is reasonable to ask why anyone would try to launch a new medical conference, let alone one focused on such a specific niche as humanistic, holistic medicine.

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Chronic Fatigue, Cardiomyopathy & Oxidative Stress: New Thinking Opens New Approaches

By Allison Templet | Contributing Writer - Vol. 9, No. 3. , 2008

Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), one of the most vexing conditions for patients and doctors alike, reflects a state of oxygen toxicity, and management of oxidative stress appears to be a key to reversing the fatigue, pain, and neuropsychological complaints associated with this disorder, says Paul R. Cheney, MD, PhD, a pioneer in the clinical research of CFS.

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Mushroom-Derived Compound Boosts Immune System Function in the Elderly

By Janet Gulland | Contributing Writer - Vol. 9, No. 3. , 2008

Immune system function tends to diminish with advancing age, leaving many elderly people more susceptible to influenza, common colds, and pneumonia, as well as various cancers. A new study shows Active Hexose Correlated Compound (AHCC), a mushroom-derived compound used in Japan as an adjunct in treatment of cancer and hepatitis, can boost T-cell mediated immune function in otherwise healthy elders.

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Helping Women with Osteoarthritis: Share Your Clinical Experience!

By Staff Writer - Vol. 9, No. 3. , 2008

New studies are showing that, like cardiovascular disease, osteoarthritis affects women differently than it does men. Women tend to have more severe pain, in more joints simultaneously, and the diseaes often has a far greater psychosocial impact. To better understand how joint disorders affect women and to identify strategies that can improve care, Holistic Primary Care is collaborating with Joyn, makers of the SheaFlex 70 joint health supplement, and Everydayhealth.com, one of the nation’s largest online health communities, on a first-of-its-kind survey of doctors and patients. We invite your participation!

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IV Nutritional Therapies: Infusions Overcome Limitations of Oral Supplementation

By Kenneth W. Cartaxo, MD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 9, No. 2. , 2008

The intravenous use of vitamins, minerals, amino acids, essential fatty acids, and other important nutrients has a long and venerable history in American medicine. But while most physicians know about it, only a small number of us are making use of these beneficial therapies to help our patients.

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Copper Deficiency May Underlie Osteoporosis, Anemia and Neurodegenerative Disorders

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief - Vol. 9, No. 1. , 2008

Copper seldom gets the attention lavished on other minerals like calcium and magnesium, but it is an essential factor for myelination of nerves, activation of immune system cells, synthesis of collagen and formation of hemoglobin. Copper deficiency, which is very common, may underlie anemia, osteoporosis, heart disease, and it may even mimic multiple sclerosis. Drugs that suppress stomach acid, as well as zinc and vitamin C supplements, contribute to copper deficiency.

Can Vitamin D & Calcium Reduce Diabetes Risk?

By Staff Writer - Vol. 9, No. 1. , 2008

Supplementation with vitamin D and calcium makes sense as a strategy to reduce risk of type 2 diabetes in people with insulin resistance or other risk factors.

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Dark Chocolate: A Good Treat-ment for Hypertension; Soy Staves Off Bone Loss

By Tori Hudson, ND | Contributing Writer - Vol. 9, No. 1. , 2008

A daily 6 gram dose of polyphenol-rich dark chocolate can induce small but clinically meaningful blood pressure reductions, and it’s a lot more patient friendly than low-salt diets or antihypertensive drugs. Genistein, one of the key isoflavones from soy, actually increases bone mineral density in women at risk for osteoporosis.