Topics

Will Medicare Cover Lifestyle Change Programs for CVD Prevention?

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief - Vol. 6, No. 1. , 2005

For the past 28 years, Dr. Dean Ornish and colleagues at the Preventive Medicine Research Institute have been quietly proving that one can reverse atherosclerosis and prevent heart attacks through diet, exercise and stress management alone. The bigger challenge is proving to Medicare and insurers that paying for these sorts of lifestyle programs is money well-spent.

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Cultures of Healing: Traditional Fermented Foods Find Their Place in the Modern World

By Rob Streisfeld, NMD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 7, No. 4. , 2006

There’s a reason why nearly all traditional cultures worldwide have some form of fermented food as part of their dietary staples. Unfortunately, in the rush to modernity and “convenience,” many people have lost the taste for things like kefir, kimchi, and natto. These and other fermented foods are extremely healthy, providing a rich source of probiotic gut bacteria, which aid digestion, reduce inflammation and promote overall health.

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Birth and Botanicals: Herbal Allies During Pregnancy and Lactation

By Janet Gulland | Staff Writer - Vol. 8, No. 1. , 2007

The idea of pregnant women taking herbal medicines makes a lot of physicians nervous. Dr. Paul Saunders believes the fear is largely unfounded. Herbs, like Viburnum, Mitchella, Rubus, Aletris, and Melissa, can safely mitigate many different health challenges during pregnancy and lactation.

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Dietary Supplements in Children: Parents Rush in Where Researchers Fear to Tread

By Dana Trevas | Contributing Writer - Vol. 2, No. 2. , 2001

Don’t expect too much help from federal authorities when trying to figure out what supplements your child might need. Though there are mountains of scientific studies on childhood nutrition, there is little consensus on how to apply that data in a practical way for optimal childhood nutrition. Parents, undaunted by the lack f “official” guidance, are figuring it all out for themselves.

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CoQ10 Delays Progression of Parkinson’s Disease

By Pat Hemminger | Contributing Writer - Vol. 4, No. 1. , 2003

Coenzyme Q10, widely known for its cardiovascular benefits, can slow the progression of Parkinson’s disease, according to a recent clinical trial. While there are no data showing that CoQ10 can prevent Parkinson’s, it does improve an affected individual’s ability to carry on daily activities and maintain independence.

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A Guide to Hispanic Healing Herbs

By Staff Writer - Vol. 2, No. 3. , 2001

Latin Americans use a wide range of herbal medicines that are not as common in other cultural communities. Cumin, Sage, Rue, Wormwood, and Chamomile are especially common. Drs. Jose Loera and Victor Sierpina, who have been studying patterns of herbal medicine use in Hispanic communities, are at work on a textbook to educate physicians about the most commonly used herbs in Latin American communities.

Vying for the Vioxx Market: Natural Meds Step into the Breach

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief - Vol. 5, No. 4. , 2004

Merck’s recall of its billion-selling COX-2 inhibitor has left millions of former Vioxx users looking for new ways to relieve pain associated with arthritis and other chronic conditions. A number of natural products companies are promoting botanical, nutritional and homeopathic preparations as natural alternatives to Vioxx. How well do they work and will they carry the same risk of cardiovascular side effects? Holistic Primary Care finds out.

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The Case for Buying Organic: Is Organically-Grown Food Truly Healthier?

By Laryn Callaway, ND | Contributing Writer - Vol. 7, No. 4. , 2006

With consumer demand for organic foods soaring all over the country, it’s a reasonable question to ask. According to Dr. Laryn Callaway, the best available data points to a resounding yes. Organically-grown foods have higher nutrient levels than their conventionally-grown counterparts, and lower levels of pesticide/herbicide residue.

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Do Calcium & Vitamin D Still Have a Place in Osteoporosis Prevention?

By Tori Hudson, ND | Contributing Writer - Vol. 7, No. 2. , 2006

Recent data have caused many patients and physicians to question the value of vitamin D and calcium supplementation to prevent osteoporosis. But a closer look at the study shows that the findings are not nearly as negative as the media reported them to be. Women’s Health columnist Dr. Tori Hudson believes the supplements still have a major role to play.

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How High Is Too High? Elevated Homocysteine Raises Stroke Specter

By Peggy Peck | Contributing Writer - Vol. 2, No. 2. , 2001

Epidemiologically, elevated homocysteine levels are correlated with increased risk of stroke. But on an individual basis, it is difficult to know when someone’s homocysteine measurement is signaling an increased likelihood of stroke.

 

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