Men’s Health

Could Genomic Testing Improve the Diagnosis of PTSD?

By Kenneth Blum, PhD - Vol. 12, No. 3. , 2011

Why is it that some combatants develop Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), while others do not? Further, why is it that some individuals with PTSD develop drug abuse or impulsivity problems, while others do not? A new line of research suggests genetics may play a role…and may also hold the keys to better treatment.

Male Infertility Linked to Cell Phone EMF Exposure

By Alasdair Philips - Vol. 12, No. 2. , 2011

Sperm counts in men worldwide have declined by half over the past 50 years and are continuing to fall. The trend has been particularly accelerated over the last decade, and a growing body of data point to EMF radiation from cell phones as a contributing factor.  The implications for “Generation Text” are serious. Alasdair Philips, a British electrical engineer, and director of Powerwatch UK, reviews the science & offers tips to minimize risk.

New Organization Promotes “Holistic Surveillance” of Prostate Cancer

By August West / Contributing Writer - Vol. 11, No. 4. , 2010

The vast majority of men with prostate cancer do not need surgery, toxic drugs or other invasive treatments, according to Aaron Katz, MD, founder of the new Society of Integrative Oncology. He believes most can be safely treated for decades with dietary changes and intensive use of plant-based anti-inflammatory and antioxidant compounds. The new organization’s prime goal is to educate doctors about the non-invasive, non-pharmaceutical options.

Lycopene Has Health Benefits Beyond Prostate Cancer Prevention

By Stacey J. Bell, DSc, RD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 8, No. 2. , 2007

A recent National Cancer Institute sponsored study has challenged the notion that increased lycopene consumption can prevent prostate cancer. But on closer analysis of the data, that conclusion is hardly written in stone. A wealth of other research shows that this valuable nutrient, found abundantly in tomatoes, can lower blood pressure, reduce cardiac events, and even protect against sunburn.

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Columbia’s Center for Holistic Urology Tests New Botanicals for Prostate Disease

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor-in-Chief - Vol. 4, No. 3. , 2003

Aaron Katz, MD, and his colleagues at the Center for Holistic Urology at New York’s Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, are studying a number of herbal medicines and nutraceuticals with potential to improve men’s urogenital health. They are particularly excited about Zyflamend, a new herbal combination containing turmeric, ginger, holy basil, and others, that appears to inhibits prostate cancer cell growth and reduces inflammation.

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Demise of PC-SPES Angers Prostate Cancer Patients

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor-in-Chief - Vol. 3, No. 2. , 2002

PC-SPES, a supplement advertised as a botanical medicine for prostate problems, was wildly popular among men with prostate cancer, largely because it seemed to work when pharmaceutical options did not. PC-SPES turned out to contain DES and warfarin, and was pulled from the market by California authorities, triggering outrage in the prostate cancer community.

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