Traditions

A Guide to Hispanic Healing Herbs

By Staff Writer - Vol. 2, No. 3. , 2001

Latin Americans use a wide range of herbal medicines that are not as common in other cultural communities. Cumin, Sage, Rue, Wormwood, and Chamomile are especially common. Drs. Jose Loera and Victor Sierpina, who have been studying patterns of herbal medicine use in Hispanic communities, are at work on a textbook to educate physicians about the most commonly used herbs in Latin American communities.

Improving the Pancreas-Kidney Marriage: A Yogic View of Diabetes

By Staff Writer - Vol. 4, No. 3. , 2003

Ayurvedic medicine and yoga view diabetes as the result of a poor marriage between the kidneys and the pancreas. This, like most illnesses, arises when organ systems are in disharmony. Bikram Choudhury, founder of the popular Bikram style of yoga, sees yoga as a way of entraining greater unity and accord among the organs.

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The Staff of Aesculapius and the Medicine Wheel: Managing Diabetes on a Pima Reservation

By August West | Contributing Writer - Vol. 4, No. 3. , 2003

Few American communities have been as hard-hit by diabetes as the Native American communities in the Southwest, where Type-2 diabetes affects up to 50% of all adults. Don Warne, MD, an Oglala Lakota physician, approaches the problem with a combination of allopathic medicine and traditional healing practices aimed at addressing the spiritual, cultural and social factors that drive the epidemic.

Kampo: Japan’s Herbal Tradition Emerges in US

By Meg Jordan, PhD, RN | Contributing Writer - Vol. 3, No. 2. , 2002

Kampo is a form of Japanese botanical medicine that has its roots in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Kampo formulas are widely used by medical doctors in Japan, and recently, a Japanese herbal medicine company called Honso introduced Sho-Saiko-to, a formula for liver disorders, and a whole series of Kampo formulas, into the US.

Tibetan Medicine—Information Is Food: Reckoning with the Mental-Emotional Digestive System

By August West | Contributing Writer - Vol. 3, No. 1. , 2002

The principles of Tibetan traditional medicine hold that just as the physical body has a digestive system for food, the mental-emotional “body” has a digestive system to process information and emotions. This system, known as the Purusa, plays a key role in health and illness, explains Vladimir Badmaev, MD, an expert on Tibetan medicine.

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Ignorance, Simple-Mindedness Are the True Dangers with Chinese Herbs

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief - Vol. 2, No. 3. , 2001

The potential dangers associated with traditional Chinese botanical medicine are highly overstated in the media, said Michael Arnold, MD, a physician and Chinese medicine practitioner. When used properly under guidance of a qualified practitioner, TCM herbs are quite safe and effective. Failure to properly understand the complexities of Chinese herbal science, and overt misuse of certain herbs like ephedra, are the real dangers.