Vitamins & Supplements

In the Thick of It: Blood Viscosity Emerges as Key Heart Risk Factor

By August West | Contributing Writer - Vol. 8, No. 1. Spring, 2007

Blood viscosity, the actual thickness of a person's blood, is emerging as an important risk factor for heart disease: thicker blood means higher risk. New technology will soon enable doctors to measure viscosity routinely. Best of all, an enzyme derived from the Japanese soy food called natto, can effectively lower blood viscosity with minimal risk of side effects.

D, C and CVD: New Studies Correlate Deficiencies With Cardiovascular Risk

By August West | Contributing Writer - Vol. 9, No. 1. Spring, 2008

Two new studies provide fresh data showing that deficiencies in vitamin D and vitamin C are strongly associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction and stroke. The big-and still unanswered question---is whether supplementing with these vitamins will reduce that risk.

Institute of Medicine Likely to Increase Vitamin D Recommendations

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief

The Institute of Medicine’s current guidelines for vitamin D intake, established in 1997, recommend 200 IU per day for people under 50 IOM, and 400 IU for those between 50-70 years old. Those numbers are way too low, say many physicians. In light of new studies showing myriad benefits and few risks from higher levels, IOM is likely to increase its recommended intake in its updated 2010 guidelines.

Enhancing Nutritional Status to Improve Fertility

By Chris Meletis, ND

Roughly 1 in 7 American couples have difficulty conceiving, and each year they spend between $2-3 billion on fertility drugs, assisted reproduction, and other medical services. In many cases, drug based interventions can be avoided through greater attention to the couple’s nutritional status and stress level, both of which profoundly affect fertility.

Metabolic Cardiology: Solving the Heart's Energy Crisis

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor-in-Chief - Vol. 9, No. 2. Summer, 2008

A new vanguard of "metabolic" cardiologists contends that cholesterol elevation has been overstated as a cause of heart disease, and that physicians should pay more attention to the heart muscle itself. A quartet of nutrients magnesium, co-enzyme Q10, L-carnitine, and D-ribose can profoundly improve the heart's pumping ability and reduce risk of death, even in very ill patients.