Vitamins & Supplements

Women's Health Research Update: Rhubarb, Maca Benefit Menopausal Women

By Tori Hudson, ND | Contributing Writer - Vol. 10, No. 2. Summer, 2009

There's much more to botanical medicine for menopausal symptoms than red clover and soy isoflavones. Three recent studies show strong benefits from a standardized extract of a specific species of Rhubarb. Maca, an Andes mountain root widely touted for enhancing men's sexual health, also benefits menopausal women.

A Role for Probiotics in Preventing, Treating Bacterial Vaginosis

By Brad J. Douglass, PhD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 10, No. 2. Summer, 2009

Say the word "probiotic" and people think, "gastrointestinal health." That's natural, since probiotics are invaluable in the management of digestive system problems. But they are also helpful for other health challenges, including infections of the female urogenital tract, like bacterial vaginosis, vulvovaginal candidiasis and related problems.

ASU & Pycnogenol Join Glucosamine on Frontline of Natural Arthritis Therapies

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor-in-Chief - Vol. 10, No. 2. Summer, 2009

Pycnogenol, an extract of French Maritime Pine bark, and Avocado-Soybean Unsaponifiables (ASU), compounds extracted from soy and avocado oils, work as well or better than available anti-arthritic medications. They also have fewer side effects and cost less.

How to Size Up Herbal Supplements: Making Sense of Spec Sheets

By Jim Rowe | Contributing Writer - Vol. 1, No. 1. October, 2000

There are wide variations in the quality of herbal medicines, and it is important to do some "due diligence" on herbal product lines. Before taking or recommending herbs, it is wise to call companies and ask about their quality control protocols. Manufacturers should be able to provide you with spec sheets and current certificates of analysis documenting the quality of their products.

High-Dose Vitamin D Shows Anti-Inflammatory Effects in CHF

By Erik Goldman | Editor in Chief - Vol. 7, No. 2. Summer, 2006

Vitamin D deficiency correlates strongly with many heart disease risk factors. A new study from Germany shows that vitamin D supplementation produces beneficial anti-inflammatory changes in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF).

In the Thick of It: Blood Viscosity Emerges as Key Heart Risk Factor

By August West | Contributing Writer - Vol. 8, No. 1. Spring, 2007

Blood viscosity, the actual thickness of a person's blood, is emerging as an important risk factor for heart disease: thicker blood means higher risk. New technology will soon enable doctors to measure viscosity routinely. Best of all, an enzyme derived from the Japanese soy food called natto, can effectively lower blood viscosity with minimal risk of side effects.

D, C and CVD: New Studies Correlate Deficiencies With Cardiovascular Risk

By August West | Contributing Writer - Vol. 9, No. 1. Spring, 2008

Two new studies provide fresh data showing that deficiencies in vitamin D and vitamin C are strongly associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction and stroke. The big-and still unanswered question---is whether supplementing with these vitamins will reduce that risk.

Institute of Medicine Likely to Increase Vitamin D Recommendations

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief

The Institute of Medicine’s current guidelines for vitamin D intake, established in 1997, recommend 200 IU per day for people under 50 IOM, and 400 IU for those between 50-70 years old. Those numbers are way too low, say many physicians. In light of new studies showing myriad benefits and few risks from higher levels, IOM is likely to increase its recommended intake in its updated 2010 guidelines.

Enhancing Nutritional Status to Improve Fertility

By Chris Meletis, ND

Roughly 1 in 7 American couples have difficulty conceiving, and each year they spend between $2-3 billion on fertility drugs, assisted reproduction, and other medical services. In many cases, drug based interventions can be avoided through greater attention to the couple’s nutritional status and stress level, both of which profoundly affect fertility.

Metabolic Cardiology: Solving the Heart's Energy Crisis

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor-in-Chief - Vol. 9, No. 2. Summer, 2008

A new vanguard of "metabolic" cardiologists contends that cholesterol elevation has been overstated as a cause of heart disease, and that physicians should pay more attention to the heart muscle itself. A quartet of nutrients magnesium, co-enzyme Q10, L-carnitine, and D-ribose can profoundly improve the heart's pumping ability and reduce risk of death, even in very ill patients.