Psyche, Some & Spirit

Nutritional Treatments for Insomnia

By Alan R. Gaby, MD Contributing Writer - Vol. 12, No. 4. Winter, 2012
Diet and nutritional status affect sleep health in many ways, and a host of nutraceutical and botanical supplements can be helpful alternatives to pharmaceutical sleep aids. In this excerpt from his Nutritional Medicine textook, Dr. Alan Gaby looks at a range of options including B vitamins, L-tryptophan, magnesium and others.

A New Approach to Promoting Healthy Sleep

By Erik Goldman - Vol. 12, No. 4. Winter, 2011
Sleep disorders are more varied and complex than simply the inability to fall asleep. They require more than a quickly jotted prescription for sedatives, which can often worsen the problem. To effectively resolve sleep problems, requires an understanding of sleep architecture & the role of deep sleep in regulating metabolism. Glysom, a new amino-acid based product, can help restore healthy sleep cycling.

In a Glutinous Mood? Exploring the Gluten Allergy & Depression Connection

By Peter Bongiorno, ND, LAc - Vol. 12, No. 4. Winter, 2011

There's increasing scientific evidence as well as clinical experience indicating a connection between depression--which affects roughly 120 million people worldwide--and gluten sensitivity. Chronic gastrointestinal inflammation, triggered by reactions to gluten, can result in neurobehavioral symptoms which often resolve when people go gluten-free.

Earthing: Restoring Health From the Ground Up

By Camilla Rees, MBA - Vol. 12, No. 3. Fall, 2011

An emerging body of research called Earthing is shedding light on the ways in which the electrical charge on the surface of the Earth can regulate human physiology. The discoveries have significant implications for prevention and treatment of many common chronic diseases.

 

Military Veterans at 4-Fold Risk for Sleep Apnea

By Kauley Jones - Vol. 12, No. 3. Fall, 2011

Military veterans are at much higher risk for obstructive sleep apnea than the general population, yet the disorder often goes undiagnosed because many vets do not fit the stereotypical profile of the "classic" apnea patient: an overweight middle-aged male who snores. Pharyngometry, a new, inexpensive & non-invasive tool can improve diagnosis.

CEFALO: Mixed Signals on The Cell Phone–Brain Tumor Issue

By Erik Goldman - Vol. 12, No. 3. Fall, 2011

A high-profile international study of the impact of cell phones on childhood brain tumor risk is sending the signal that there is no “exposure-response relationship. However, some environmental health experts contend that significant safety concerns are hidden within the data.

Making Sense of CEFALO

By August West - Vol. 12, No. 3. Fall, 2011

CEFALO, a multi-center European project, is the first study to look specifically at the impact of self-reported mobile phone use on risk of childhood brain tumors. While it  seemed to dispel the notion that EM radiation from cellphones can cause brain tumors, critics contend that the conclusions are not so clear cut. Writers from the Environmental Health Trust challenge CEFALO's findings; a spokesman from the study team responds.

Mind-Body Tips for Harried Clinicians

By James Gordon, MD - Vol. 12, No. 2. Summer, 2011

These days, many health care professionals are feeling harried, hassled and helpless. Dr. James Gordon, founder of the Center for Mind Body Medicine, and a featured speaker at the upcoming 2011 Heal Thy Practice conference, offers simple but powerful exercises that can help you shed some of those anxieties and frustrations, and reconnect with the inspiration that drew you into medicine.

Natural Dopaminergic Activator Improves Outcomes of Addiction Recovery

By Kenneth Blum, PhD / Contributing Writer - Vol. 12, No. 1. Spring, 2011

In the past decade,  researchers on neuroanatomy and neurotransmitters have found links between genes, the brain, and addiction behavior. What we now know about the dopamine reward circuits in the brain is helping addiction specialists to create effective holistic approaches to addiction recovery.

Once Considered “Fringe,” Yoga Enters Mainstream Cancer Care

By August West / Contributing Writer - Vol. 12, No. 1. Spring, 2011

Over the last decade, yoga has emerged as a favored adjunctive modality at cancer centers across the country. Studies presented at the Society of Integrative Oncology’s annual meeting show that carefully tailored yoga programs can reduce anxiety, improve sleep, reduce the need for meds, and improve flexibility.