Nutrition & Lifestyle

Connexins: Optimizing Health by Improving Intercellular Communication

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief - Vol. 8, No. 1. Spring, 2007

Connexins are the molecules that connect cells together and regulate passage of biochemical signals through our tissues. Their degree of openness, and consequently, the level of intercellular information flow, is greatly affected by nutrition, lifestyle and environmental factors-especially the relative acidity of one's diet. Neurophysiologist Darrell Tanelian, MD, PhD, has developed a comprehensive, user-friendly diet and lifestyle program aimed at improving health by improving connexin function at the cellular level.

Sustainable Weight Loss: Understanding Famine Physiology and the Psychology of Obesity

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief - Vol. 8, No. 3. Fall, 2007

In 2001, Jon Abrams was a successful fast-track Wall Streeter. He was also morbidly obese, weighing over 400 lb. Despite disciplined dieting on everything from Atkins to Zone, he couldn’t lose weight, until he began to understand why his body wanted to be fat. Speaking at the American Holistic Medical Association’s annual conference, he shared lessons learned on his journey back to fitness.

Fibroids, Endometriosis & Breast Cancer: Treating Systemic Estrogen Toxicity

By Janet Gulland | Contributing Writer - Vol. 8, No. 2. Summer, 2007

According to Dr. Joel Evans, a holistic gynecologist, these three disorders are far more related than many doctors realize. All reflect maladaptive responses to systemic estrogen, and all are related to obesity and insulin resistance. Rather than focusing on the tumors, physicians ought to be working with women to lose weight, reduce insulin levels, improve estrogen metabolism, and lower inflammation.

Lycopene Has Health Benefits Beyond Prostate Cancer Prevention

By Stacey J. Bell, DSc, RD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 8, No. 2. Summer, 2007

A recent National Cancer Institute sponsored study has challenged the notion that increased lycopene consumption can prevent prostate cancer. But on closer analysis of the data, that conclusion is hardly written in stone. A wealth of other research shows that this valuable nutrient, found abundantly in tomatoes, can lower blood pressure, reduce cardiac events, and even protect against sunburn.

"Bad Cholesterol": Good Marketing, But Is It Good Medicine?

By Cleaves M. Bennett, MD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 8, No. 3. Fall, 2007

The cholesterol model of heart disease, which labels LDL as “bad” and HDL as “good,” has certainly helped drug companies sell a lot of statin medications. But has it really reduced the impact of obesity, heart disease and diabetes in this country? “Not really,” says Dr. Cleaves Bennett, one of the nation’s leading experts on hypertension, kidney disease and preventive medicine.

Obesity in Women: Conjugated Linoleic Acid, Calcium May Be Valuable Allies

By Tori Hudson, ND | Contributing Writer - Vol. 8, No. 3. Fall, 2007

Obesity is especially common among women. Recent studies show that women can lose small but clinically meaningful amounts of weight through the Atkins, Zone, Ornish or LEARN diet regimens. Conjugated linoleic acid may be a valuable ally in weight loss. Calcium supplementation may also help.

Mostly Ocean: A New Wave of Interest Quinton's Marine Therapy

By August West | Contributing Writer - Vol. 8, No. 3. Fall, 2007

More than 100 years ago, French physiologist Rene Quinton described similarities between human blood plasma and ocean water, and he established a whole system of "marine therapies," making use of specially harvested seawater to treat everything from skin rashes to tuberculosis. Today, a new generation of clinicians worldwide are discovering the salutary effects of Quinton’s "Marine Plasma."

Well-Oiled: A Guide to Healthy Dietary Fats

By Janet Gulland | Contributing Writer - Vol. 8, No. 3. Fall, 2007

The “No Fat” approach health maintenance makes very little sense, says Dr. David Riley. Rather than focusing on eliminating fat calories, physicians should be counseling patients on how to choose and use healthy, nutritious oils like flax, olive, walnut, macadamia and avocado. A little knowledge of fatty acid science can go a long way in clearing up confusion about “good” versus “bad” fats.

Black Cohosh Is Back; Soy Nuts Shine

By Tori Hudson, ND | Contributing Writer - Vol. 8, No. 4. Winter, 2007

Two new studies reassert the value of Black Cohosh in managing menopausal symptoms and depression. A separate study indicates that a handful of roasted soy nuts per day can reduce blood pressure as well as menopausal symptoms. Dr. Tori Hudson reviews the data and offers her opinions on the findings.

Hair Analysis, Antioxidant Testing: Popular with Patients, But Are They Clinically Valid?

By Cathy Creger Rosenbaum, PharmD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 8, No. 4. Winter, 2007

In their effort to get a grip on their health, many people are utilizing "alternative" diagnostic tests that claim to identify nutrient deficiencies, environmental toxins, and disease risk factors. Some of these tests are backed good science, others are not, but even the legitimate ones may not be able to provide the type of guidance that patients are seeking. In Part One of this series, Cathy Creger Rosenbaum looks at hair analysis and antioxidant testing.