Naturopathic Perspective

Hypothyroidism: Very Common But Easily Missed

By Michael Traub, ND - Vol. 8, No. 4. Winter, 2007

Hypothyroidism is very common, and it has serious health consequences, including cardiovascular disease, obesity, menorrhagia, infertility, polycystic ovarian syndrome, depression, psoriasis, and urticaria. But you'll often miss it if you rely solely on conventional diagnostic criteria.

Sensitivity, Stress Reduction & Quelling Inflammation Are Keys to Managing Acne

By Michael Traub, ND - Vol. 8, No. 3. Fall, 2007

High-dose vitamin A, an inflammation-lowering diet, stress reduction and a healthy dose of kindness can go a long way toward reducing the physical and psychosocial impact of acne.

The Naturopathic Approach for Psoriasis

By Michael Traub, ND & Monica Scheel, MD - Vol. 8, No. 2. Summer, 2007

Psoriasis is thought to be the result of T-cell activation initiated by unidentified antigens. These activated T-cells release cytokines like tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) that lead to keratinocyte proliferation. This hyper-proliferative response decreases epidermal transit time from the normal 28 days to 2–4 days, ultimately leading to the erythematous scaly plaques that characterize the disease.

Does C-reactive Protein Have a Place in the CVD Risk Pantheon?

By Michael Traub, ND - Vol. 8, No. 1. Spring, 2007

One of the hottest debates in cardiology for the past few years centers on the question of whether C-reactive protein is a meaningful risk indicator for heart disease. It clearly correlates with a tendency toward inflammation, but is it truly causative? Dr. Traub contends that even if there's no direct causal relationship, an elevated CRP is telling you that something's wrong---something that warrants attention.

Seafood Safety Reports Make Big Splash

By Michael Traub, ND - Vol. 7, No. 4. Winter, 2006

The issue of whether or not to eat fish has had a lot of people floundering in recent years. Many are concerned about mercury and other environmental toxins found in some fish. Two major reports, one from the Institute of Medicine, and another from researchers at Harvard insist that the health benefits of a fish-rich diet far outweigh the minimal risks. Enviro-groups contend that the reports are downplaying the pollution problem.