Functional Medicine

Reckoning with Statin-Induced Diabetes and Metformin Resistance

By Thomas G. Guilliams, PhD, Contributing Writer - Vol. 13, No. 3. Fall, 2012

Drug therapies to reduce cardiovascular risk and prevent the onset of diabetes may be effective in the short term, but as people age, the efficacy of drugs like statins and metformin tends to diminish, while the risk of adverse effects increases. The benefit of nutritional and lifestyle interventions, on the other hand, remains robust even as people enter their final decades.

Low Vitamin D Levels May Trigger Weight Gain

By Erik Goldman

A new and interesting angle on the vitamin D story is emerging from research on weight gain in older women. The vitamin, it seems, is an important metabolic signal that indirectly regulates the propensity to store fat.

Not-So-Obvious Cardiometabolic Risk Factors Worth Considering

By Erik Goldman - Vol. 12, No. 3. Fall, 2012

Elevated cholesterol and high blood glucose are the obvious features of diabetes and heart disease but they're hardly the whole picture. Other, less obvious factors including environmental toxins like BPA and lead, gastrointestinal disorders, and frequent use of artificial sweeteners are also important drivers of disease. According to Dr. Mark Hyman, author of the popular book, The Blood Sugar Solution, these oft-overlooked factors warrant closer attention.

MTHFR Mutation: A Missing Piece in the Chronic Disease Puzzle

By Bianca Garilli, ND, Contributing Writer - Vol. 13, No. 2. Summer, 2012

Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is one of the most important enzymes in human physiology, having influence on at least as many biochemical processes as it has syllables in its name. Deficiencies in this enzyme increase the risk of CVD, several types of cancer, congenital defects, and inflammatory bowel disease. Fortunately, deficiencies are correctable with targeted supplementation.

Blood Viscosity: The Unifying Parameter In Cardiovascular Disease Risk

By Ralph E. Holsworth, Jr., DO & Jonathan V. Wright, MD - Vol. 13, No. 1. Spring, 2012

Increased blood viscosity is the only biological parameter that has been linked with all of the other major heart disease risk factors, including high blood pressure, elevated LDL cholesterol, low HDL, type-II diabetes, metabolic syndrome, obesity, smoking, age, and male gender. Until recently, technological limitations made it impractical for doctors to measure this key risk factor. Fortunately, that's changing.

Sublingual Immunotherapy: Allergy Relief Under Your Tongue

By Scott Rollins, MD / Contributing Writer - Vol. 11, No. 4. Winter, 2010

 

Sublingual immunotherapy is a safe, highly effective alternative to injection-based treatments for managing allergies. Moreover, it enables primary care physicians to treat patients that they are currently referring out to specialists.

 

Who’s in Bed with the IOM? Vitamin D Report Prompts Conflict of Interest Suspicion

By Erik Goldman

The Institute of Medicine’s Nov. 30 consensus statement claiming most Americans do not need supplemental vitamin D—a position that runs counter to the views of many clinicians and researchers⎯has some folks wondering if committee members had preexisting biases or vested interests against supplementation.


It turns out that at least two members of the committee hold patents on synthetic vitamin D analogs in development or already on the market as prescription drugs, and significant relationships with companies involved in vitamin D drug development.