Chronic Disease

Getting to the Eye of the Storm In People with Diabetes

By Fred Pescatore, MD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 11, No. 2. Summer, 2010

Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of new cases of vision loss in adults between ages 20 and 74, and more than 40% of people newly diagnosed with diabetes already have some level of retinal damage. The good news is that the disease process can be prevented or arrested by reducing sugar intake, regular exercise and targeted use of nutraceuticals like chromium picolinate, lutein, zeaxanthin, and Pycnogenol.

To Improve Weight Loss, Focus On Real People, Real Life & Real Food

By Christopher Fuzy, MS, RD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 11, No. 1. Spring, 2010
Doctors who understand their patients’ unique personality traits and motivating factors, and who can provide individually-tailored food guidelines will go much further in empowering patients to meet their weight and health goals—and they’ll get there at much lower costs than with commercial programs based on processed meal replacements.

New Tools Give Primary Care An Open Window on Ocular Health

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief - Vol. 11, No. 1. Spring, 2010

Ocular and retinal health are not usually considered part of primary care, but given the high and rising incidence of diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration, and other serious eye disorders, it’s time primary care doctors started looking their patients directly in the eye. New clinical tools are making that a lot easier.

Oximation & Cancer: Rethinking the Pathogenic Paradigm

By Roby Mitchell, MD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 11, No. 1. Spring, 2010
Cancer doesn’t “just happen.” It occurs in a physiological environment characterized by chronic inflammation, oxidative stress, pH changes, and ischemia. Interestingly, Candida albicans also thrives in and contributes to this inner environment. The good news is that this is reversible through hormone balancing, and dietary changes aimed at reducing inflammation.

To Prevent Osteoporosis, Concentrate On Vitamin D, Not Bisphosphonates

By August West | Contributing Writer - Vol. 11, No. 1. Spring, 2010
The evidence supporting widespread use of bisphosphonate drugs for preventing osteoporosis fractures is pretty weak, while the data in favor of vitamin D supplementation is increasingly strong. Doctors who advocate “evidence-based medicine” need to rethink the role of drugs in treating women with osteoporosis.

Assessing & Treating Bone Loss: Seven Tips For Improving Outcomes

By Meg Sinclair | Contributing Writer - Vol. 11, No. 1. Spring, 2010
Because of its very slow, insidious nature, osteoporosis is challenging to evaluate. Long-term daily drug therapy carries significant risk of side effects, a big price tag, and major compliance challenges. The key is to determine early on who is at greatest risk for fracture, and who truly needs intensive therapy.

An Irish Seaweed Harbors Healthful Minerals for Osteoarthritis

By Tori Hudson, ND | Contributing Writer - Vol. 10, No. 1. Spring, 2010

A new, mineral-rich nutraceutical derived from a species of Irish marine algae has shown promise for improving joint function and reducing the need for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in patients with moderate to severe osteoarthritis.

Ubiquinol, the “Other CoQ10” May Help When Standard Forms Don’t

By Dallas Clouatre, PhD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 10, No. 4. Winter, 2009

Clinical research on CoQ10 continues to point toward new uses including blood pressure reduction, glycemic control and potentially reducing risk of neurodegenration. CoQ10 in its reduced form, known as ubiquinol, often improves outcomes in conditions like as severe heart failure, when the more common ubiquinone form, has proven ineffective.

Restoring Digestive Health is Key to Optimizing Weight Loss

By August West | Contributing Writer - Vol. 10, No. 4. Winter, 2009

The problem with most medical weight loss programs is that they focus too much on weight loss and not nearly enough on overall health. Somae Health is a new 12-week, medically guided weight management program that begins with restoration of healthy gastrointestinal function.

The Clinical Picture of Hypothyroidism

By Roby Mitchell, MD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 9, No. 3. Fall, 2008

Thyroid hormone plays a central role in energy metabolism and immune competence. Accurate diagnosis and treatment of hypothyroidism is essential to restoring health. But most physicians rely too much on questionably reliable blood tests, and not enough on what their eyes and their patients are telling them. This photo gallery, compiled by Roby Mitchell, MD, reveals the common clinical signs of hypothyroidism.