Chronic Disease

Sinus Cleansing Could Cut Drug Overuse for Sinusitis, URIs

By August West | Contributing Writer - Vol. 11, No. 3. Fall, 2010
Recurrent sinusitis and upper respiratory tract infections account for more than $1 billion in unnecessary and largely useless antibiotic prescriptions annually. This is a major driver of antibiotic resistance. Much of it could be prevented if patients prone to sinus problems, seasonal allergies and respiratory infections routinely practiced sinus irrigation. New updates on the classical Indian neti pot could make this simple self-care practice more appealing to Americans.

Aerobic Exercise Improves Quality of Life in Adults with Asthma

By Meg Sinclair - Vol. 11, No. 3. Fall, 2010

A recent controlled study of 101 people with asthma underscores the potential benefit of aerobic fitness training in reducing the symptom burden and improving the overall quality of life.

Reaching Closure: Tips for Healing Chronic, “Non-Healing” Wounds

By Scott R. Nelson, DO | Contributing Writer - Vol. 11, No. 2. Summer, 2010

Non-healing wounds typically occur in unhealthy bodies. If we want the wounds to heal, we need to understand the connections between poor diet, hormonal decline, unhealthy lifestyle and inability to heal. A comprehensive lifestyle change program coupled with targeted nutrient therapies and conventional wound care can greatly improve wound closure & reduce the need for amputation.

For a Healthier Practice, Look Honestly At Your Own Resistance to Change

By Christopher Fuzy, MS, RD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 11, No. 2. Summer, 2010

Just as lifestyle change can be hard for patients because it requires them to embrace new ways of doing things, nutrition and lifestyle-based medicine can be challenging for many doctors because it requires new skill sets, new routines, and a willingness to change. But don't let that stop you! The need for lifestyle-based medicine has never been greater and neither have the opportunities who can provide patients with healthy ways to lose weight and improve wellbeing.

 

Getting to the Eye of the Storm In People with Diabetes

By Fred Pescatore, MD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 11, No. 2. Summer, 2010

Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of new cases of vision loss in adults between ages 20 and 74, and more than 40% of people newly diagnosed with diabetes already have some level of retinal damage. The good news is that the disease process can be prevented or arrested by reducing sugar intake, regular exercise and targeted use of nutraceuticals like chromium picolinate, lutein, zeaxanthin, and Pycnogenol.

To Improve Weight Loss, Focus On Real People, Real Life & Real Food

By Christopher Fuzy, MS, RD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 11, No. 1. Spring, 2010
Doctors who understand their patients’ unique personality traits and motivating factors, and who can provide individually-tailored food guidelines will go much further in empowering patients to meet their weight and health goals—and they’ll get there at much lower costs than with commercial programs based on processed meal replacements.

New Tools Give Primary Care An Open Window on Ocular Health

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief - Vol. 11, No. 1. Spring, 2010

Ocular and retinal health are not usually considered part of primary care, but given the high and rising incidence of diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration, and other serious eye disorders, it’s time primary care doctors started looking their patients directly in the eye. New clinical tools are making that a lot easier.

Oximation & Cancer: Rethinking the Pathogenic Paradigm

By Roby Mitchell, MD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 11, No. 1. Spring, 2010
Cancer doesn’t “just happen.” It occurs in a physiological environment characterized by chronic inflammation, oxidative stress, pH changes, and ischemia. Interestingly, Candida albicans also thrives in and contributes to this inner environment. The good news is that this is reversible through hormone balancing, and dietary changes aimed at reducing inflammation.

To Prevent Osteoporosis, Concentrate On Vitamin D, Not Bisphosphonates

By August West | Contributing Writer - Vol. 11, No. 1. Spring, 2010
The evidence supporting widespread use of bisphosphonate drugs for preventing osteoporosis fractures is pretty weak, while the data in favor of vitamin D supplementation is increasingly strong. Doctors who advocate “evidence-based medicine” need to rethink the role of drugs in treating women with osteoporosis.

Assessing & Treating Bone Loss: Seven Tips For Improving Outcomes

By Meg Sinclair | Contributing Writer - Vol. 11, No. 1. Spring, 2010
Because of its very slow, insidious nature, osteoporosis is challenging to evaluate. Long-term daily drug therapy carries significant risk of side effects, a big price tag, and major compliance challenges. The key is to determine early on who is at greatest risk for fracture, and who truly needs intensive therapy.