Cardiovascular Health

To Reduce Age-Related Heart Risk, Target the Mitochondria

By August West, Contributing Writer

It’s an unfortunate fact of nature: mitochondrial function tends to decline with age. Along with that comes a host of physiological changes that cumulatively result in the phenomenon we all experience as aging and senescence. Fortunately, a new form of mitochondrially-targeted co-enzyme Q10 can reverse some of these changes. 

Is Galectin-3 Inhibition a Key to Reducing Heart Failure?

By Isaac Eliaz, MD, LAc, Contributing Writer

A fast-growing body of data points to galectin-3 (Gal-3) -- an adhesive cell surface protein—as a potential therapeutic target for reducing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Modified Citrus Pectin, a natural substance derived from citrus fruit peels, is the only known natural compound that can bind Gal-3, potentially reducing CVD risk.

Two Landmark Studies Shed New Light--and Shadow-- on Omega-3s for CVD

By William H. Harris, PhD, Contributing Writer

Two pivotal studies on omega-3s —the long awaited REDUCE-IT and VITAL trials, attempt to clarify the clinical roles of omega-3s for cardiovascular risk reduction. While many of the mainstream headlines took a negative view of the findings, the data actually show some meaningful benefits from omega-3s. Dr. Bill Harris, developer of the Omega-3 Index test, weighs in on the negative and positive messags of these important studies.

"Cleaner" Proteins Scrub Arteries, Reduce Cardiovascular Risk

By Jessica Best, Contributing Writer

Patients at risk of atherosclerosis may have new hope for cleaner arteries thanks to a naturally occurring “scrubber” protein that exists within the body. Alpha-1-microglobin (A1M), referred to as a "circulating wastebasket," scavenges free radicals as well as blood fats that have already been oxidized, potentially opening up a new avenue for reversing atherosclerosis.

Resveratrol Improves Insulin Sensitivity

By Andrea Strohecker | Contributing Writer

Resveratrol, a polyphenolic compound found in red wine and widely touted for its antioxidant and cell signaling effects, also improves insulin sensitivity, according to a recent study by researchers at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY.