Herbal Medicine

Palm Oils, Breast Milk Share Potent Antimicrobial Compounds

By Janet Gulland | Staff Writer - Vol. 3, No. 1. , 2002

Coconuts, like the human breast, produce medium-chain fatty acids, which have strong antimicrobial properties. Monolaurin, a monoglyceride of lauric acid, one of the key fatty acids in coconuts, is proving effective as a treatment for Staphylococcal and Streptococcal infections. It also appears to work against pathogenic fungi and some viruses as well.

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Enzyme Awareness Can Clear Herb Drug Interactions Fog

By Todd Zwillich | Contributing Writer - Vol. 3, No. 1. , 2002

Many herbal compounds are metabolized by the same set of liver enzymes, the Cytochrome P450 group, as are pharmaceuticals. A clear knowledge of which herbs are metabolized by which enzymes will help clear up much of the confusion and concern about herb-drug interactions.

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Botanical Antibiotics: Oil of Oregano Offers Alternative for Fungal, Bacterial Infections

By Janet Gulland | Staff Writer - Vol. 3, No. 1. , 2002

Herbal medicine truly represents a crossroad between the culinary and medical arts. Nowhere is this more apparent than in the emerging body of data showing that a number of commonly used cooking herbs contain powerful antimicrobial and antioxidant compounds.

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A Guide to Hispanic Healing Herbs

By Staff Writer - Vol. 2, No. 3. , 2001

Latin Americans use a wide range of herbal medicines that are not as common in other cultural communities. Cumin, Sage, Rue, Wormwood, and Chamomile are especially common. Drs. Jose Loera and Victor Sierpina, who have been studying patterns of herbal medicine use in Hispanic communities, are at work on a textbook to educate physicians about the most commonly used herbs in Latin American communities.

Hispanic Communities Show Unique Patterns of Herb Use

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief - Vol. 2, No. 3. , 2001

Use of herbal medicine is widespread in Latin American communities, according to a study by researchers at the University of Texas. People from Hispanic cultures tend to favor herbs in tea and tincture form, rather than as pills or capsules. They are also more likely to use herbal plasters, baths and poultices than members of other ethnic groups.

Extracts of Coriolus Improve Survival in GI, Lung, Breast Cancer Patients

By Janet Gulland | Staff Writer - Vol. 2, No. 3. , 2001

The coriolus or “Turkey Tail” mushroom is a common denizen of dead tree stumps worldwide. But it is proving to be uncommon medicine for a number of cancer types. Used for centuries in Asian medicine, coriolus extracts are now being studied in modern medical settings.

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Mushroom Extracts: Powerful Medicine from Humble Sources

By Janet Gulland | Staff Writer - Vol. 2, No. 3. , 2001

Mushrooms are mysterious, and where there is mystery, there is often medicine. Asian traditional medicine has known this for centuries, and various kinds of mushrooms occupy a prominent place in Chinese, Japanese and Tibetan medicine. A review of some modern mushroom medicines making their way into Western clinical practice.

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New SPES Formula Offers Promise for Liver Cancer

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief - Vol. 2, No. 2. , 2001

A combination of herbs based on a traditional Chinese formula, is proving effective in inducing necrosis in various types of liver cancer cells.

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Honoring the Spiritual Roots of Plant Medicine

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief - Vol. 2, No. 1. , 2001

Herbal medicine can take many forms. Herbs can be used as simple “green pills” for symptom relief, but they can also serve as “teachers,” helping us re-connect our human lives to the life of Earth as a whole. Bill Mitchell, ND, one of the nation’s true medical visionaries, reminds us “The plants…figured out how Gaia could have a relationship with the Sun in a way that supports life.” He shares his views on the spiritual and practical aspects of plant medicine.

Harvesting the Best of the Botanical Book Bloom

By Janet Gulland | Staff Writer - Vol. 2, No. 1. , 2001

Books on botanical medicine are multiplying almost as fast as the botanical products themselves. Varro Tyler, PhD, a world-renowned botanical medicine expert, now deceased, gave us his picks for essential herbal medicine reference books.

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