Functional Medicine

IDA Medical Foundation Seeks to “Democratize” Prevention

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor-in-Chief - Vol. 9, No. 4. , 2008

Cutting edge early risk detection tests and preventive medicine have become the privilege of the wealthy. Dr. James Ehrlich, a pioneer in cardiovascular risk assessment, hopes to change that with his new Identify Disease in Advance Foundation, which will bring state-of-the-art preventive medicine to people who can least afford it but would most benefit from it.

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Chronic Fatigue, Cardiomyopathy & Oxidative Stress: New Thinking Opens New Approaches

By Allison Templet | Contributing Writer - Vol. 9, No. 3. , 2008

Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), one of the most vexing conditions for patients and doctors alike, reflects a state of oxygen toxicity, and management of oxidative stress appears to be a key to reversing the fatigue, pain, and neuropsychological complaints associated with this disorder, says Paul R. Cheney, MD, PhD, a pioneer in the clinical research of CFS.

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Breast Thermography: Can It Open a Window for Breast Cancer Prevention?

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor-in-Chief - Vol. 9, No. 3. , 2008

Breast thermography is safe, radiation-free, relatively inexpensive, and it can detect early and possibly reversible metabolic and vascular changes associated with later growth of breast cancer. Though underutilized in the US, it is poised for a resurgence.

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Electrodermal Testing: What It Can and Cannot Tell

By Cathy Creger Rosenbaum, PharmD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 9, No. 1. , 2008

Based on the idea that organ system functions are reflected in galvanic currents on the skin surface, electrodermal testing has become a very popular “alternative” diagnostic technique. Available data suggest that there are electrical currents on the skin, and one study shows that ET can, indeed, detect internal problems. But data are scant, and there’s no evidence this controversial technique can identify specific causes of internal problems, as ET practitioners often claim it can.

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Hypothyroidism: Very Common But Easily Missed

By Michael Traub, ND - Vol. 8, No. 4. , 2007

Hypothyroidism is very common, and it has serious health consequences, including cardiovascular disease, obesity, menorrhagia, infertility, polycystic ovarian syndrome, depression, psoriasis, and urticaria. But you’ll often miss it if you rely solely on conventional diagnostic criteria.

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When Doing the Right Thing Means Choosing the Lesser of a Few Evils

By Janet Brown - Vol. 8, No. 4. , 2007

Greater eco-consciousness means making better choices about the materials we use. But sometimes, there are no clear-cut “good” substitutes for toxic materials, and the choice comes down to selecting the least impactful of available options. Case in point: compact fluorescent lightbulbs which save energy but contain mercury.

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Hair Analysis, Antioxidant Testing: Popular with Patients, But Are They Clinically Valid?

By Cathy Creger Rosenbaum, PharmD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 8, No. 4. , 2007

In their effort to get a grip on their health, many people are utilizing “alternative” diagnostic tests that claim to identify nutrient deficiencies, environmental toxins, and disease risk factors. Some of these tests are backed good science, others are not, but even the legitimate ones may not be able to provide the type of guidance that patients are seeking. In Part One of this series, Cathy Creger Rosenbaum looks at hair analysis and antioxidant testing.

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Connexins: Optimizing Health by Improving Intercellular Communication

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief - Vol. 8, No. 1. , 2007

Connexins are the molecules that connect cells together and regulate passage of biochemical signals through our tissues. Their degree of openness, and consequently, the level of intercellular information flow, is greatly affected by nutrition, lifestyle and environmental factors-especially the relative acidity of one’s diet. Neurophysiologist Darrell Tanelian, MD, PhD, has developed a comprehensive, user-friendly diet and lifestyle program aimed at improving health by improving connexin function at the cellular level.

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Basic Supplements for Reversing Metabolic Syndrome

By Staff Writer - Vol. 7, No. 4. , 2006

Lipoic Acid, Green Tea Extract, and Fish Oils are among the cornerstone supplements for helping people improve their glucose metabolism and preventing diabetes.

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Whole Grains Mean a Whole Lot Less Diabetes

By Staff Writer - Vol. 7, No. 4. , 2006

Daily consumption of magnesium-rich whole grains took a 30% bite out of the risk of diabetes among a cohort of more than 40,000 Black women, according to a recently published transatlantic study.

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