Cardiovascular Health

Chronic Fatigue, Cardiomyopathy & Oxidative Stress: New Thinking Opens New Approaches

By Allison Templet | Contributing Writer - Vol. 9, No. 3. , 2008

Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), one of the most vexing conditions for patients and doctors alike, reflects a state of oxygen toxicity, and management of oxidative stress appears to be a key to reversing the fatigue, pain, and neuropsychological complaints associated with this disorder, says Paul R. Cheney, MD, PhD, a pioneer in the clinical research of CFS.

The Content you are trying to see is available only for members of our site. If you already have a Membership you need to log in to see it. Please follow this link if you want to register.

Metabolic Cardiology: Solving the Heart’s Energy Crisis

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor-in-Chief - Vol. 9, No. 2. , 2008

A new vanguard of “metabolic” cardiologists contends that cholesterol elevation has been overstated as a cause of heart disease, and that physicians should pay more attention to the heart muscle itself. A quartet of nutrients magnesium, co-enzyme Q10, L-carnitine, and D-ribose can profoundly improve the heart’s pumping ability and reduce risk of death, even in very ill patients.

HPC Readers Boost TACT Trial Enrollment

By Staff Writer - Vol. 9, No. 2. , 2008

Readers of Holistic Primary Care are giving a big boost to the Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT), a landmark NIH study to determine whether chelation therapy can prevent heart attacks. After reading about the ongoing trial in our Spring 2008 edition, 17 physician readers called the study’s headquarters in Miami Beach, seeking to enroll their clinics as study sites.

The Content you are trying to see is available only for members of our site. If you already have a Membership you need to log in to see it. Please follow this link if you want to register.

D, C and CVD: New Studies Correlate Deficiencies With Cardiovascular Risk

By August West | Contributing Writer - Vol. 9, No. 1. , 2008

Two new studies provide fresh data showing that deficiencies in vitamin D and vitamin C are strongly associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction and stroke. The big-and still unanswered question—is whether supplementing with these vitamins will reduce that risk.

The Content you are trying to see is available only for members of our site. If you already have a Membership you need to log in to see it. Please follow this link if you want to register.

“Bad Cholesterol”: Good Marketing, But Is It Good Medicine?

By Cleaves M. Bennett, MD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 8, No. 3. , 2007

The cholesterol model of heart disease, which labels LDL as “bad” and HDL as “good,” has certainly helped drug companies sell a lot of statin medications. But has it really reduced the impact of obesity, heart disease and diabetes in this country? “Not really,” says Dr. Cleaves Bennett, one of the nation’s leading experts on hypertension, kidney disease and preventive medicine.

The Content you are trying to see is available only for members of our site. If you already have a Membership you need to log in to see it. Please follow this link if you want to register.

Does C-reactive Protein Have a Place in the CVD Risk Pantheon?

By Michael Traub, ND - Vol. 8, No. 1. , 2007

One of the hottest debates in cardiology for the past few years centers on the question of whether C-reactive protein is a meaningful risk indicator for heart disease. It clearly correlates with a tendency toward inflammation, but is it truly causative? Dr. Traub contends that even if there’s no direct causal relationship, an elevated CRP is telling you that something’s wrong—something that warrants attention.

The Content you are trying to see is available only for members of our site. If you already have a Membership you need to log in to see it. Please follow this link if you want to register.

In the Thick of It: Blood Viscosity Emerges as Key Heart Risk Factor

By August West | Contributing Writer - Vol. 8, No. 1. , 2007

Blood viscosity, the actual thickness of a person’s blood, is emerging as an important risk factor for heart disease: thicker blood means higher risk. New technology will soon enable doctors to measure viscosity routinely. Best of all, an enzyme derived from the Japanese soy food called natto, can effectively lower blood viscosity with minimal risk of side effects.

Rethinking Hyperlipidemia and Natural Treatment Options for Women at Risk

By Tori Hudson, ND | Contributing Writer - Vol. 7, No. 3. , 2006

A recent metanalysis is challenging the notion that soy protein and soy isoflavones can improve women’s cholesterol profiles. But the study did not account for the fact that some women convert soy isoflavones into equol, a powerful phytoestrogen, while others do not. In a separate study, German researchers found that policosanol, a sugar cane derived substance, had no meaningful effect on lipid profiles or cardiovascular risk.

The Content you are trying to see is available only for members of our site. If you already have a Membership you need to log in to see it. Please follow this link if you want to register.

Vitamin E Supplements Raise Blood Pressure in Hypertensive People with Type 2 Diabetes

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief - Vol. 7, No. 3. , 2006

An Australian study shows that vitamin E can actually raise blood pressure in hypertensive patients with Type 2 Diabetes. Though it is not clear whether this occurs in people without hypertension, the data suggest that diabetics need to be very careful with this antioxidant vitamin.

The Content you are trying to see is available only for members of our site. If you already have a Membership you need to log in to see it. Please follow this link if you want to register.

Melatonin: Circadian Cycle Regulator Has Role in Treatment of Cancer, Hypertension

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief - Vol. 7, No. 3. , 2006

Most people think of melatonin as a sleep aid and jet lag remedy, owing to its ability to regulate circadian rhythms. But this compound has many other benefits, including regulation of blood pressure and slowing the growth of several types of cancer.

The Content you are trying to see is available only for members of our site. If you already have a Membership you need to log in to see it. Please follow this link if you want to register.