Latest Articles

What's in Your Water....And What to Do About It

By Russell Jaffe, MD, Contributing Writer

Public drinking water routinely contains contaminants that the body does not benefit from and that are sometimes downright toxic. What can we do to improve the quality and healthfulness of the water that we, and our patients, use? Here are some tips regarding the most common systems based on my research.

FDA Mandates Major Overhaul of Supplement Labels

By Kristen Schepker, Assistant Editor

For the first time in over two decades, the Food and Drug Administration is mandating changes to the way foods and dietary supplements are labeled. The new regulations call for significant revision of numerous long-used health and nutrition standards, and will affect healthcare practitioners, patients, and industry players alike.

Doctors vs Insurance CEOs: A Tale of Two Surveys

By Erik Goldman, Editor in Chief

Two recent surveys--one assessing physician income by specialty, the other looking at annual compensation packages for top health insurance CEOs--tells a troubling tale about the nation's healthcare priorities and the value systems that shape our medicine.

Giving the “Green Light” to Stess Reduction

By Russell Jaffe, MD, PhD

Regular exposure to dichromatic (also called “dichroic”) light is an effective modality for positively influencing the neural pathways between the eyes and the brain in ways that help to reduce the negative impact of chronic stress, and to help the body shift toward greater balance.

How Honest Are Gluten Free Food Claims?

By Beth Donnelly, Contributing Writer

With so many food manufacturers, restaurant chains, and even personal care companies jumping on the GF bandwagon, we need to ask ourselves an important question: Can we trust that GF products are truly “Gluten Free”? In most cases, the answer is "Yes," according to a study by the Food and Drug Administration.

The Caregiver Crisis: Rising Demand, Short Supply Puts Elderly at Risk

By Erik Goldman, Editor in Chief

As the population ages, the need for eldercare is soaring. Yet the number of people willing and able to provide these services is falling short. The impending eldercare gap is one of the biggest public health challenges confronting the nation, an issue that will sooner or later touch just about everyone regardless of race, creed, ethnicity or economic status. But nobody really wants to talk about it.