Latest Articles

The First Sickness Is Fear

By August West | Contributing Writer - Vol. 4, No. 2. April, 2003

According to Marilyn Youngbird, a Native American healer from North Dakota, fear is the root of most illnesses. Fear, guilt and self-judgment induce chemical changes in the mind and body that result in sickness. She and other Native American medicine people believe that healing the soul pain underneath the physical symptoms is the key to long-lasting health.

Revitalizing Your Office with Feng Shui

By Barry A. Sultanoff, MD - Vol. 1, No. 1. October, 2000

Many medical clinics are drab, joyless environments. But they don't have to be this way. Dr. Barry Sultanoff shows how the principles of Feng Shui, the Chinese art of environmental design, can be easily applied to health care settings, transforming them from sterile and depressing treatment rooms to energized healing spaces.

Tibetan Medicine in America: Ancient Roots, New Soil

By Gloria St. John | Contributing Writer - Vol. 2, No. 1. February, 2001

Tibetan medicine is one of the world's oldest medical systems, providing insight into the ways consciousness and the physical body are inter-related. It has survived the tests of time, political upheaval, warfare and exile. Can it survive the American health care system?

Eskimos Discover Sat-Fats Grease the Wheels of Disease

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor-in-Chief - Vol. 2, No. 1. February, 2001

Heart disease and diabetes were virtually unheard-of among Alaskan Eskimos, until the 1970s, when they abandoned their hunting and fishing lifestyle, and their marine diet. They began eating a lot of processed foods and saturated fats, and living in more sedentary ways. Thirty years later, these diseases are rampant. Dr. Sven Ebbeson is working with Eskimo communities to reverse these deadly trends.

UCSF Breast Cancer Study Puts Tibetan Medicine on Trial

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor-in-Chief - Vol. 2, No. 2. April, 2001

The University of California, San Francisco recently sponsored the first ever collaboration between allopathic medical oncologists and a traditional Tibetan physician. Dr. Yeshi Dhonden, the Dalai Lama's personal physician, was invited to participate in the treatment of women with advanced breast cancer, as part of an investigation of the efficacy of Tibetan herbal medicine for cancer.

Hispanic Communities Show Unique Patterns of Herb Use

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor-in-Chief - Vol. 2, No. 3. June, 2001

Use of herbal medicine is widespread in Latin American communities, according to a study by researchers at the University of Texas. People from Hispanic cultures tend to favor herbs in tea and tincture form, rather than as pills or capsules. They are also more likely to use herbal plasters, baths and poultices than members of other ethnic groups.

Tibetan Study Had Roots in Personal Experience

By Staff Writer - Vol. 2, No. 2. April, 2001

UCSF's landmark study of Tibetan herbal medicine in the treatment of breast cancer had its roots in one woman's personal struggle with the disease. When UCSF cytogeneticist, Helene Smith, was diagnosed with breast cancer, she turned to the services of Yeshi Dhonden, a Tibetan Buddhist physician, and one of the major exponents of Tibetan medical traditions.

A Guide to Hispanic Healing Herbs

By Staff Writer - Vol. 2, No. 3. June, 2001

Latin Americans use a wide range of herbal medicines that are not as common in other cultural communities. Cumin, Sage, Rue, Wormwood, and Chamomile are especially common. Drs. Jose Loera and Victor Sierpina, who have been studying patterns of herbal medicine use in Hispanic communities, are at work on a textbook to educate physicians about the most commonly used herbs in Latin American communities.

Holistic Healthcare News Briefs: Do These Phthalates Make Me Look Fat?

By Staff Writer - Vol. 10, No. 2. Summer, 2009

There appears to be a strong correlation between teenage obesity and exposure to phthalates—endocrine-disrupting compounds found in many personal care products and a myriad of plastic and vinyl products.

Holistic Healthcare News Briefs: Putting a "Dent" in CVD

By Staff Writer - Vol. 10, No. 1. Spring, 2009

Periodontal care takes a bite out of heart disease risk; Putting a face on a CT improves radiologist accuracy; NY State ponders a soda pop tax.