Latest Articles

Helping Women with Osteoarthritis: Share Your Clinical Experience!

By Staff Writer - Vol. 9, No. 3. Fall, 2008

New studies are showing that, like cardiovascular disease, osteoarthritis affects women differently than it does men. Women tend to have more severe pain, in more joints simultaneously, and the diseaes often has a far greater psychosocial impact. To better understand how joint disorders affect women and to identify strategies that can improve care, Holistic Primary Care is collaborating with Joyn, makers of the SheaFlex 70 joint health supplement, and Everydayhealth.com, one of the nation’s largest online health communities, on a first-of-its-kind survey of doctors and patients. We invite your participation!

Fee-for-Service, Concierge Practice: The Right Models for Holistic Care?

By August West | Contributing Writer - Vol. 9, No. 3. Fall, 2008

Despite the rapid growth of public interest in holistic medicine, and broader acceptance in medical circles, most Americans are hard-pressed to find physicians who provide comprehensive holistic care. Because most holistic services are not covered by insurance, doctors are obliged to develop new practice models outside the insurance framework. Fee-for-service and concierge care hold great appeal, but also present significant challenges.

Physicians, Techies & Policymakers Try to Close the Primary Care IT Gap

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor-in-Chief - Vol. 9, No. 3. Fall, 2008

If well designed and carefully implemented, electronic medical records (EMRs) can improve patient care, reduce medical errors and save physicians a lot of money. But cost factors and time demands have conspired so that fewer than 10% of all solo and small group practices have EMRs. A growing number of IT-savvy physicians, software designers and policymakers hope to change that.

What to Do - And What Not to Do - If Your State Medical Board Comes A'Calling

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor-in-Chief - Vol. 9, No. 3. Fall, 2008

Disciplinary action from a state medical board is among every physician's worst nightmares, and in some states, doctors who practice holistic medicine are especially vulnerable. But if you know your state laws, practice scrupulously, obtain informed consent from patients, and you've got competent legal backup, you have little to worry about, according to Alan Dumoff, JD, an attorney who specializes in representing integrative physicians.

New Board Offers Nutrition Certification for All Licensed Health Care Professionals

By Arthur A. Fierro, DC | Contributing Writer - Vol. 9, No. 2. Summer, 2008

In an effort to improve nutrition education for all health care professionals, he American Clinical Board of Nutrition (ACBN) has launched the first federally-recognized nutrition science certification program. Certification is open to licensed health professionals from any and all of the healing disciplines.

The Energetics of Foods for Health and Healing

By Susan Krieger, LAc, MS | Contributing Writer - Vol. 10, No. 2. Summer, 2009

Biomedical science has reduced foods to the sum of their calories and micronutrients. While it is important to understand the biochemistry of what we eat, it is also important to realize that the qualities, colors, textures of our foods and the ways they are cooked play just as much of a role as their "nutrient content" in influencing our health. Traditional Chinese medicine has much to teach us on this subject.

Oximation in Practice: Clearing Acne & Related Skin Disorders

By Roby Mitchell, MD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 10, No. 2. Summer, 2009

Acne, psoriasis, rosacea and other common skin disorders are reflections of the same systemic inflammatory processes that underlie heart disease, diabetes, irritable bowel, and many other chronic disorders. Eliminating high-glycemic foods, restoring hormone balance, and minimizing inflammation will not only resolve these skin problems, they will also reduce risk of more serious diseases along the way.

Exercise Centers Are a Good "Fit" For Primary Care Clinics

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor-in-Chief - Vol. 10, No. 1. Spring, 2009

A growing number of primary care doctors are discovering that clinic-based exercise centers are a good "fit" for their patients' physical health, and for their own fiscal health. A turnkey model called Integrative Health Network (iH3) is enabling more doctors to bring exercise medicine into their practices and to people who might never set foot in a commercial fitness club.

GGT: An Accurate, Inexpensive Predictor of Cardiometabolic Risk

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor-in-Chief - Vol. 9, No. 4. Winter, 2008

Gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) is a hepatic enzyme that indicates levels of oxidative stress in the liver. A large body of research suggests that it can also predict onset of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. At under $10 per test, it could be a very valuable asset in clinical practice.

Iridology: Mirror of the Soul, Perhaps, But the Iris Is Unreliable for Medical Diagnosis

By Cathy Creger Rosenbaum, PharmD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 9, No. 3. Fall, 2008

The notion that the patterns of color and texture in the irises of the eyes can indicate the health or dysfunction of various organ systems, has been around for several hundred years. Unfortunately, scientific study of iridology fails to support it as an accurate method for detecting diseases. Despite the lack of evidence, the practice remains popular, particularly in Europe and the UK.