Latest Articles

The Clinical Picture of Hypothyroidism

By Roby Mitchell, MD | Contributing - Vol. 9, No. 3. Fall, 2008

Thyroid hormone plays a central role in energy metabolism and immune competence. Accurate diagnosis and treatment of hypothyroidism is essential to restoring health. But most physicians rely too much on questionably reliable blood tests, and not enough on what their eyes and their patients are telling them. This photo gallery, compiled by Roby Mitchell, MD, reveals the common clinical signs of hypothyroidism.

Making Sense of Bioidentical Hormones

By Michael Traub, ND, FABNO - Vol. 9, No. 3. Fall, 2008

Use of bioidentical hormones - estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone derived from plants such as soy or yam - has grown rapidly over the last decade. According to a new FDA rule, claims that bioidentical hormones are safer or more effective than conventional HRT are false and misleading. The issue has become one of the hottest women's health controversies.

Black Cohosh Compares Favorably With Drug Therapy for Menopausal Symptoms

By Tori Hudson, ND | Contributing Writer - Vol. 9, No. 3. Fall, 2008

In the first head to head comparison of a botanical therapy versus a drug for management of menopausal symptoms, a standardized formulation of Black Cohosh was equally effective as tibolone, a drug widely used in Europe and Asia; the herbal formula had fewer adverse effects. Pycnogenol, an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory derived from the bark of French Maritime Pine trees, can reduce menopausal symptoms while improving women’s lipid profiles.

Metabolic Cardiology: Solving the Heart's Energy Crisis

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor-in-Chief - Vol. 9, No. 2. Summer, 2008

A new vanguard of "metabolic" cardiologists contends that cholesterol elevation has been overstated as a cause of heart disease, and that physicians should pay more attention to the heart muscle itself. A quartet of nutrients magnesium, co-enzyme Q10, L-carnitine, and D-ribose can profoundly improve the heart's pumping ability and reduce risk of death, even in very ill patients.

Natural Therapies for Allergic Rhinitis

By Kamyar Hedayat, MD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 9, No. 3. Fall, 2008

Allergic rhinitis may not be the most serious problem confronting us as primary care physicians. But it is very common, affecting up to one-fifth of the US population, including children. This amounts to 40,000,000 people. While not life threatening, it causes a great deal of discomfort, and more importantly, it can be an indicator of dysfunction of the adrenals, liver, immune system, or of dysbiosis and/or chronic stress, all of which warrant careful assessment and treatment.

Black Cohosh Compares Favorably With Drug Therapy for Menopausal Symptoms

By Tori Hudson, ND | Contributing Writer - Vol. 9, No. 3. Fall, 2008

In the first head to head comparison of a botanical therapy versus a drug for management of menopausal symptoms, a standardized formulation of Black Cohosh was equally effective as tibolone, a drug widely used in Europe and Asia; the herbal formula had fewer adverse effects. Pycnogenol, an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory derived from the bark of French Maritime Pine trees, can reduce menopausal symptoms while improving women’s lipid profiles.

To Sleep, Perchance To Heal: Managing Sleep Disorders Without Medications

By Janet Gulland | Contributing Writer - Vol. 9, No. 3. Fall, 2008

Chronic sleep problems are so common that many people simply accept them as an inevitable part of modern life. But lack of sleep is extremely detrimental to health. According to Anne McClenon, ND, chronic sleep loss should be considered a medical emergency. But quick-fix drugs are not the answer. Nutrients like melatonin, herbs like Valerian, and elimination of late night TV or computer use, are a lot safer and more effective in restoring healthy sleep.

Japanese Researchers Find Ampelopsis Vine Harbors Potential Hepatitis Therapy

By Janet Gulland | Contributing Writer - Vol. 8, No. 4. Winter, 2007

It sometimes happens, given the complex nature of our relationship with plants, that one person's bane turns out to be another's balm.

Black Cohosh Is Back; Soy Nuts Shine

By Tori Hudson, ND | Contributing Writer - Vol. 8, No. 4. Winter, 2007

Two new studies reassert the value of Black Cohosh in managing menopausal symptoms and depression. A separate study indicates that a handful of roasted soy nuts per day can reduce blood pressure as well as menopausal symptoms. Dr. Tori Hudson reviews the data and offers her opinions on the findings.

New Data Reveal Anti-Inflammatory, Cartilage-Sparing Effect of Shea Extract in Osteoarthritis

By Janet Gulland | Contributing Writer - Vol. 8, No. 4. Winter, 2007

Triterpenes from the shea nut, an emerging natural treatment for osteoarthritis and other joint problems, can greatly reduce markers of inflammation and cartilage breakdown, according to a new study by Dr. Philip Cheras, director of the Australian Centre for Complementary Medicine Education and Research (ACCMER), Brisbane.