Traditions

UCSF Breast Cancer Study Puts Tibetan Medicine on Trial

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor-in-Chief - Vol. 2, No. 2. April, 2001

The University of California, San Francisco recently sponsored the first ever collaboration between allopathic medical oncologists and a traditional Tibetan physician. Dr. Yeshi Dhonden, the Dalai Lama's personal physician, was invited to participate in the treatment of women with advanced breast cancer, as part of an investigation of the efficacy of Tibetan herbal medicine for cancer.

Hispanic Communities Show Unique Patterns of Herb Use

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor-in-Chief - Vol. 2, No. 3. June, 2001

Use of herbal medicine is widespread in Latin American communities, according to a study by researchers at the University of Texas. People from Hispanic cultures tend to favor herbs in tea and tincture form, rather than as pills or capsules. They are also more likely to use herbal plasters, baths and poultices than members of other ethnic groups.

Tibetan Study Had Roots in Personal Experience

By Staff Writer - Vol. 2, No. 2. April, 2001

UCSF's landmark study of Tibetan herbal medicine in the treatment of breast cancer had its roots in one woman's personal struggle with the disease. When UCSF cytogeneticist, Helene Smith, was diagnosed with breast cancer, she turned to the services of Yeshi Dhonden, a Tibetan Buddhist physician, and one of the major exponents of Tibetan medical traditions.

A Guide to Hispanic Healing Herbs

By Staff Writer - Vol. 2, No. 3. June, 2001

Latin Americans use a wide range of herbal medicines that are not as common in other cultural communities. Cumin, Sage, Rue, Wormwood, and Chamomile are especially common. Drs. Jose Loera and Victor Sierpina, who have been studying patterns of herbal medicine use in Hispanic communities, are at work on a textbook to educate physicians about the most commonly used herbs in Latin American communities.