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Infectious Disease

The Lyme Disease "Rogue's Gallery"

By Erik Goldman - Vol. 12, No. 3. Fall, 2011

Borrelia berdorferi takes the rap as the prime cause of Lyme disease, but it seldom works alone. Ticks carry many other pathogens that often co-infect people with Lyme. Here is a line-up of some of the most common co-pathogens and their clinical characteristics.

 

Shape Shifters, Hidden Accomplices & Nature’s Dirty Needles: Confronting the Challenges of Lyme Disease

By Erik Goldman - Vol. 12, No. 3. Fall, 2011

There are reasons why Lyme Disease is so difficult to treat: Borrelia bergdorferi, the main pathogen, is one a highly complex shape-shifting organism, and it is only susceptible to treatment during certain phases of it's life-cycle. Plus, it seldom works alone. Other bugs like Babesia, Ehrlichia, and Bartonella, are common accomplices. Dr. Joe Burrascano, one of the nation's leading Lyme experts offers diagnostic & therapeutic tips.

Is Herpes A Trigger for Alzheimer’s Disease?

By Erik Goldman - Vol. 12, No. 2. Summer, 2011
An emerging line of research is implicating the herpes simplex virus and other infectious pathogens as underlying triggers for formation of β-amyloid plaques in the brain, the hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease. The possibility that there is an infectious component in the development of Alzheimer's opens new possibilities for preventing and treating this devastating disorder.

Institute for Functional Medicine Conference To Focus on Challenges of Infectious Disease

By Sheila Quinn / Contributing Writer - Vol. 12, No. 1. Spring, 2011
Forty years ago, the Surgeon General declared that we’d “won the war on infectious disease.” Unfortunately, we now know that’s not true. Not only have new pathogens arisen since then (HIV, avian flu, Ebola, to name a few), centuries-old ones have morphed into more virulent forms, thanks in large part to overuse of antibiotics and other drugs. The Institute for Functional Medicine’s 20th Anniversary Symposium offers a unique opportunity to learn integrative strategies for meeting the challenges of infectious diseases in the 21st century.

Ginseng Extract Safely Reduces Incidence, Recurrence of Respiratory Infections

By Janet Gulland / Contributing Writer

A standardized extract of Panax ginseng root (Panax quinquefolium) is proving safe and effective for preventing and ameliorating acute respiratory infections, particularly  among elderly individuals.

 

Vitamin D3 Gives Mixed Results for Preventing Flu in Schoolchildren

By Erik Goldman

At

a dose of 1,200 IU per day, vitamin D3 reduced the incidence of Influenza A among a cohort of Japanese schoolchildren, but was associated with an increase in incidence of Influenza B, giving no overall advantage in preventing flu-associated illness.

 

Sinus Cleansing Could Cut Drug Overuse for Sinusitis, URIs

By August West | Contributing Writer - Vol. 11, No. 3. Fall, 2010
Recurrent sinusitis and upper respiratory tract infections account for more than $1 billion in unnecessary and largely useless antibiotic prescriptions annually. This is a major driver of antibiotic resistance. Much of it could be prevented if patients prone to sinus problems, seasonal allergies and respiratory infections routinely practiced sinus irrigation. New updates on the classical Indian neti pot could make this simple self-care practice more appealing to Americans.

Clostridium difficile: How Worried Should We Be?

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief - Vol. 11, No. 2. Summer, 2010

Clostridium difficile has surpassed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) as Microbial Enemy No. 1 in America's hospitals. This bug can cause severe, often life threatening colitis, is increasingly common and more virulent than it used to be. Overuse of antibiotics is a main driver of the epidemic, and public health leaders are calling on community based physicians to be extremely judicious in their use of antibiotics.

The Swine Flu Mirror

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor-in-Chief - Vol. 10, No. 4. Winter, 2009

What’s really interesting about H1N1 is the way it seems to mirror back to people what they fear most and trust least. Our individual reactions and responses to this bug tell us more about our human nature, than the nature of the virus or its potential health consequences.

Naturopathic Doctor vs. H1N1 Virus

By Michael Traub, ND, FABNO - Vol. 10, No. 4. Winter, 2009

What happens when a naturopathic doctor & his girlfriend get the H1N1 flu? A whole lot of coughing, sneezing, fevering and bed rest, that’s what. Swine flu is  nasty, says Dr. Michael Traub, but for most people it’s not likely to be life-threatening.

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