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Healthy Aging

Getting to the Eye of the Storm In People with Diabetes

By Fred Pescatore, MD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 11, No. 2. Summer, 2010

Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of new cases of vision loss in adults between ages 20 and 74, and more than 40% of people newly diagnosed with diabetes already have some level of retinal damage. The good news is that the disease process can be prevented or arrested by reducing sugar intake, regular exercise and targeted use of nutraceuticals like chromium picolinate, lutein, zeaxanthin, and Pycnogenol.

Vitamin E Tocotrienols Prevent Post-Stroke Neuronal Death

By Howard Simon | Contributing Writer - Vol. 11, No. 1. Spring, 2010

A new study

shows that tocotrienols, an important component of naturally occurring Vitamin E, can prevent neural damage following ischemic stroke, potentially improving post-stroke outcomes.

Assessing & Treating Bone Loss: Seven Tips For Improving Outcomes

By Meg Sinclair | Contributing Writer - Vol. 11, No. 1. Spring, 2010
Because of its very slow, insidious nature, osteoporosis is challenging to evaluate. Long-term daily drug therapy carries significant risk of side effects, a big price tag, and major compliance challenges. The key is to determine early on who is at greatest risk for fracture, and who truly needs intensive therapy.

To Prevent Osteoporosis, Concentrate On Vitamin D, Not Bisphosphonates

By August West | Contributing Writer - Vol. 11, No. 1. Spring, 2010
The evidence supporting widespread use of bisphosphonate drugs for preventing osteoporosis fractures is pretty weak, while the data in favor of vitamin D supplementation is increasingly strong. Doctors who advocate “evidence-based medicine” need to rethink the role of drugs in treating women with osteoporosis.

Vitamin D Deficiency Predicates Poor Outcomes in Breast Cancer

By Tori Hudson, ND | Contributing Writer - Vol. 10, No. 4. Winter, 2009

A new prospective study of 512 women with early-stage breast cancer suggests that those with the low serum vitamin D levels were more likely to die of their cancers than those with sufficient D levels.

Institute of Medicine Likely to Increase Vitamin D Recommendations

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief

The Institute of Medicine’s current guidelines for vitamin D intake, established in 1997, recommend 200 IU per day for people under 50 IOM, and 400 IU for those between 50-70 years old. Those numbers are way too low, say many physicians. In light of new studies showing myriad benefits and few risks from higher levels, IOM is likely to increase its recommended intake in its updated 2010 guidelines.

CoQ10 Delays Progression of Parkinson's Disease

By Pat Hemminger | Contributing Writer - Vol. 4, No. 1. January, 2003

Coenzyme Q10, widely known for its cardiovascular benefits, can slow the progression of Parkinson's disease, according to a recent clinical trial. While there are no data showing that CoQ10 can prevent Parkinson's, it does improve an affected individual's ability to carry on daily activities and maintain independence.

The GAIT Trial: Glucosamine-Chondroitin Hit Their Stride for Severe Osteoarthritis

By Jason Theodosakis, MD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 7, No. 1. Spring, 2006

Data from the long awaited Glucosamine/Chondroitin Arthritis Intervention Trial (GAIT), one of the largest nutritional supplement studies ever undertaken, shows that while this combination of natural products did not offer too much help for patients with mild arthritis, it outperformed celecoxib (Celebrex) in people with the most severe disease.

Simple Solutions for Common Nutrient Deficiencies

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor in Chief - Vol. 1, No. 1. October, 2000

Many people who end up in doctors' offices have nutritional deficiencies, including deficiencies in protein, B vitamins, and magnesium that markedly impact their overall health status. These deficiencies are easily reversed, if only physicians would think about them.

Healthy Diet May Reduce Risk of Alzheimer's Disease

By Peggy Peck | Contributing Writer - Vol. 1, No. 1. October, 2000

The same low-fat, vegetable and fruit-rich diet that prevents heart disease also reduces the risk of Alzheimer's disease. The good news is that diet appears to have the greatest preventive impact in people at the highest genetic risk for Alzheimer's.

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