Digestive Health

Botanical Medicine's "Shiny Horse" Rides to the Rescue of Damaged Mucous Membranes

By Janet Gulland | Contributing Writer - Vol. 7, No. 3. Fall, 2006

Named for Pegasus, the flying horse of Greek myth, Sea Buckthorn plant (Hippophae rhamnoides) has been mainstay of traditional medicine in Eastern Europe and Asia for centuries. Its orange berries are very rich in Omega 7 fatty acids as well as vitamin E and other compounds speed the healing and support the integrity of the skin and other mucous membranes. It may have an important role in treating irritable bowel syndrome and other gut problems.

New Food Labeling Regs: Consensus on Allergens, Contention Over Mercury

By Staff Writer - Vol. 6, No. 4. Winter, 2005

New food allergen labeling regulations, effective in January 2006, will make it easier for food-sensitive people to avoid allergy triggers.

Coping with the Challenge of Celiac Disease

By Erik L. Goldman | Editor-in-Chief - Vol. 6, No. 4. Winter, 2005

Once thought to be relatively rare, celiac disease is actually very common, and physicians need to pay more attention to it. A naturopathic physician who has the condition herself offers insights on diagnosing, treating and living with this complex digestive disease.

Cutting the CRAP: Natural Therapies Improve Abdominal Pain in Children

By Janet Gulland | Staff Writer - Vol. 6, No. 4. Winter, 2005

Chronic recurrent abdominal pain is very common in children. Fortunately, the majority of kids with this problem will respond well to combinations of herbal therapies, dietary changes, and biofeedback, reports Joy Weidert, MD. This is a far safer approach than wanton use of antispasmodics, anti-depressants or other drugs that have little evidence to support their use for abdominal pain in kids.

Chronic Fatigue, Cardiomyopathy & Oxidative Stress: New Thinking Opens New Approaches

By Allison Templet | Contributing Writer - Vol. 9, No. 3. Fall, 2008

Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), one of the most vexing conditions for patients and doctors alike, reflects a state of oxygen toxicity, and management of oxidative stress appears to be a key to reversing the fatigue, pain, and neuropsychological complaints associated with this disorder, says Paul R. Cheney, MD, PhD, a pioneer in the clinical research of CFS.