Chronic Disease

Who’s in Bed with the IOM? Vitamin D Report Prompts Conflict of Interest Suspicion

By August West / Contributing Writer

 

The Institute of Medicine’s Nov. 30 consensus statement claiming most Americans do not need supplemental vitamin D, and that the vitamin has few benefits beyond bone health, has some folks wondering if committee members had preexisting biases or vested interests against supplementation.

It turns out that at least two members of the committee hold patents on synthetic vitamin D analogs used as prescription drugs, or have significant relationships with companies involved in vitamin D drug development.

Treating Skin Disorders From the Inside Out: An Interview with Dr. Julia Hunter

By Roby Mitchell, MD / Contributing Writer - Vol. 11, No. 4. Winter, 2010

Many dermatologists will lip-service the ideas that, “beauty begins from within,” and “Skin health is a reflection of overall health.” But very few of them practice that way. Dr. Julia Hunter, a holistic dermatologist in Los Angeles, is a rare exception. In this interview with Dr. Roby Mitchell, Dr. Hunter shares insight on connections between the skin and the gut, the role of vitamin C in skin care, skin care ingredients to avoid, and much more.

Helping Patients Step Off Antidepressants

By Michael Banov, MD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 11, No. 3. Fall, 2010
Antidepressants are the most widely-prescribed class of drugs in the US, and primary care doctors prescribe 74% of ‘em. Drug companies give ample guidance on starting meds, but little help in ceasing treatment. Yet many people want off their meds. Psychiatrist Michael Banov offers his insight on when and how to stop antidepressant treatment.

Telomeres, Aging, & Disease Prevention: Do Telomere-Targeted Treatments Have a Role in Clinical Practice?

By Stephen Holt, MD, PhD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 11, No. 3. Fall, 2010
Telomeres—segments of chromosomes that prevent aberration or loss of genetic information during cell division—are among the hottest research topics these days, and they’ve become the focus of “anti-aging” and chronic disease prevention strategies. Like many areas of genetic research, the work on telomeres raises as many questions as it answers. Anti-aging specialist Dr. Stephen Holt explores the many nuances of telomere and telomerase research, offering his own clinically tested recommendations.

Sinus Cleansing Could Cut Drug Overuse for Sinusitis, URIs

By August West | Contributing Writer - Vol. 11, No. 3. Fall, 2010
Recurrent sinusitis and upper respiratory tract infections account for more than $1 billion in unnecessary and largely useless antibiotic prescriptions annually. This is a major driver of antibiotic resistance. Much of it could be prevented if patients prone to sinus problems, seasonal allergies and respiratory infections routinely practiced sinus irrigation. New updates on the classical Indian neti pot could make this simple self-care practice more appealing to Americans.

Aerobic Exercise Improves Quality of Life in Adults with Asthma

By Meg Sinclair - Vol. 11, No. 3. Fall, 2010

A recent controlled study of 101 people with asthma underscores the potential benefit of aerobic fitness training in reducing the symptom burden and improving the overall quality of life.

Reaching Closure: Tips for Healing Chronic, “Non-Healing” Wounds

By Scott R. Nelson, DO | Contributing Writer - Vol. 11, No. 2. Summer, 2010

Non-healing wounds typically occur in unhealthy bodies. If we want the wounds to heal, we need to understand the connections between poor diet, hormonal decline, unhealthy lifestyle and inability to heal. A comprehensive lifestyle change program coupled with targeted nutrient therapies and conventional wound care can greatly improve wound closure & reduce the need for amputation.

For a Healthier Practice, Look Honestly At Your Own Resistance to Change

By Christopher Fuzy, MS, RD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 11, No. 2. Summer, 2010

Just as lifestyle change can be hard for patients because it requires them to embrace new ways of doing things, nutrition and lifestyle-based medicine can be challenging for many doctors because it requires new skill sets, new routines, and a willingness to change. But don't let that stop you! The need for lifestyle-based medicine has never been greater and neither have the opportunities who can provide patients with healthy ways to lose weight and improve wellbeing.

 

Getting to the Eye of the Storm In People with Diabetes

By Fred Pescatore, MD | Contributing Writer - Vol. 11, No. 2. Summer, 2010

Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of new cases of vision loss in adults between ages 20 and 74, and more than 40% of people newly diagnosed with diabetes already have some level of retinal damage. The good news is that the disease process can be prevented or arrested by reducing sugar intake, regular exercise and targeted use of nutraceuticals like chromium picolinate, lutein, zeaxanthin, and Pycnogenol.